Graham Hancock is no stranger to modern discourse on the nature of consciousness. Since his early scholarly days he has challenged materialist science with alternative theories addressing mysteries of ancient civilizations, extra-terrestrials, psychedelics, and consciousness. In a recent lecture at the National Arts Club Art and Technology Committee, Hancock continued his controversial examination of the aforementioned topics.

He opened his lecture with a question addressed to famous evolutionist, atheist, and author, Richard Dawkins, probing him on one of atheism’s most imperative conjectures, “How do you prepare for life in a world where there is no God?”

Hancock went on to recite Dawkins’s answer, “You prepare for it by knowing that life is what we have and so you better make it a life to the fullest”. Although he asserted that he couldn’t agree more with the notion of living one’s life to the fullest, Hancock didn’t accept Dawkins’s materialist view which states that consciousness is only a product of electro-chemical brain activity. He believes there is a lot more to consciousness than that expressed from the empty reductionist view point.

“What science is this [opinion] based on? What has [Dawkins] done to prove that there is nothing after death?”

Hancock argues Dawkins’s statement with a bold case, expressing that he is merely stating his “very narrow and very limited ‘religious’ belief”. Dawkins’s belief is just that, an act of faith, because there is no scientific evidence to back up his claim. But nevertheless, a large majority of people still buy into these scientists’ beliefs based on their university credentials.

Last year, Hancock released a TEDx Talk that was subsequently banned due to the subject matter discussed. Hancock elaborated on the reason in his lecture,

“Certainly the brain is involved in consciousness in some vital way, but it’s unclear exactly how and this is the first area that I got into trouble with TED for my brief TEDx Talk which was on their website for a couple of weeks before they took it off. I couldn’t understand why they took it off, but it later became clear that there is a faction of scientists who advised TED who belong to what is called the materialist/reductionist tendency, and they believe that all phenomena can be reduced to matter, and that there is nothing that exists outside of the material realm if it cannot be measured or counted.”

Does the brain create consciousness like a generator produces electricity? Material scientists believe that consciousness is an epi-phenomenon or a miracle or sorts. They understand its development in relation to the Darwinian concept of ‘survival of the fittest’, that our brains evolved to have this consciousness as an advantage over other species. They state that once we’re dead, consciousness no longer exists, and we are simply reduced to matter. “What about near-death-experiences or out-of-body-experiences?” Hancock asks.

To refute this model, Hancock uses the analogy of a TV and its antenna. “The relationship of the brain and consciousness might be more like a TV set and the TV signal. And again, I got into trouble with TED even for suggesting this, but they will say ‘I know consciousness is localized to the brain because when I shut off this area of the brain , this or that area of your consciousness will blink out, and therefore that proves that your brain makes that bit of your consciousness’. But isn’t that true with the TV analogy? If you damage the TV screen, the picture won’t be so good, but that doesn’t mean the signal isn’t there still.”

To get a clearer understanding of consciousness and life after death, Hancock suggests looking back at ancient civilizations, particularly the ancient Egyptians, who possessed a remarkable model of the afterlife. By studying the intricate and numerous hieroglyphs in the pyramid walls (transcribed today in what is known as the Book of The Dead), one quickly realizes the Egyptians honoured death even more so than life as a large majority of their lives were based around the preparation for death, and that when this time came a soul would face Anubis in a review of their life. The consequences of a person’s life choices were something to reflect on deeply according to the Egyptians. Likewise, the Ancient Egyptians believed in reincarnation – after each life a soul would review lessons learned in the previous life to ensure that they would not repeat them in the next.

The Egyptians held strong beliefs about life after death.

The Egyptians held strong beliefs about life after death.

Interestingly, Hancock also adds an alternative narrative to the Egyptian civilization which may challenge many people’s beliefs. Referencing the Tibetan Book of The Dead, Hancock revealed their belief that love, ethics, and mediation alone cannot bring one enlightenment. He asserts that the Egyptians used psychedelic plants to access higher levels of consciousness. Famous ethnopharmacologist Dennis McKenna proposes the Tree of Knowledge depicted in engravings was actually a reference to the plant Acacia Nilotica, which contains levels of DMT in its bark. The Egyptians were known alchemists, so this extraction theory should not be considered far-fetched.

Hancock moves his attention to the ancient texts of the Hermetics and the Gnostics, quoting an line from one of the texts, “Man’s duty is not to acquiesce in his merely human state but rather in the strength of his contemplation of things divine to scorn and disguise that mortal part which has been attached to him because it was needful that he should keep and tend the lower world.” This was also a central aspect of the Egyptian texts, that we should not be attached to our material body, that we reach for the ‘heavens’ as a metaphor for our spiritual self.

The Gnostics also were also early opponents of certain sects of Christianity, specifically Catholicism, stating that no ‘God’ would judge another human being, let alone advocate burning someone at the stake. They viewed Christ as a teacher who didn’t actually die for our sins, that we are responsible for our own sins. Another controversial concept from early Gnosticism reveals that the serpent in the story of Adam and Eve was not in fact the devil, for the serpent was trying to tell them about the ‘Tree of knowledge’, and ‘God’ was trying to keep this knowledge away from humans to ensure they wouldn’t attain godly power through this knowledge.  An early Gnostic art piece exposes the Tree of Knowledge for what it actually is, the psychedelic mushroom Amanita Muscaria.

The Gnostics alluded to the 'Tree of Knowledge' being the psychedelic mushroom, Amanita Muscaria.

The Gnostics alluded to the ‘Tree of Knowledge’ being the psychedelic mushroom, Amanita Muscaria.

A faction of the Gnostics called the Cathars who lived in Southern France in the 1100s were surprisingly advanced for their time: they believed in equality for all, influenced the Troubadour music wave, ate mainly vegetarian, promoted universal literacy, and even made their own paper. Unfortunately, anyone who held Cathar/Gnostic beliefs was persecuted by the Roman Catholics in a crusade which took place in the late 1100s. This was largely due to the fact the Cathars saw the Pope as an agent of the devil.

Most monotheistic faiths impose leaders between the people and the divine (i.e., Christianity, Judaism, Islam). These ideological factions talk the talk about peace and love but walk the walk of hatred and suspicion. Hancock makes the daring assertion that it’s these three faiths which are at the root of the world’s problems today.  The state is the next form of segregation which ultimately places the control of our consciousness in the hands of others. States operate on fear, hatred, and suspicion, (war on terror, national security). Hancock addresses the pointlessness of patriotism, asking what its relevance really is. “Why should we be especially attached to someone because they happen to be born on the same piece of land as me? Shouldn’t we be interested in a community of ideas? Shouldn’t we be patriotic to the entire human race? We’ve become a species of amnesia, lulled into a false sense of purpose.”

“There is a war on our consciousness”, Hancock states. It is curious why a natural brain hormone like DMT is a Schedule I drug, yet the ancient Egyptians pegged it as the ‘Tree of Life’.  Shouldn’t we have sovereignty over our own consciousness? Natural mind-expanding plants are categorized as dangerous, yet pharmaceuticals and alcohol kill millions each year. Perhaps Hancock isn’t too far off in his statement.

Hancock presents a strong argument against material science. There is a rigidness within this faction of belief that reduces the unlimited to something finite, something Hancock pegs as a dishonour to the miracle that is consciousness. Hancock also advocates to be weary of both modern and timeworn control schemes (i.e., religion, pharmaceuticals, the state) which aim to suppress the evolution of consciousness, a warning which may trigger the defence of many but stands as a crucial wake-up call to the world. Just as the ancients affirmed, psychedelics must be seen as an important tool in exploring and expanding human consciousness. Perhaps these natural tools truly do hold the key to the advancement of mankind’s evolution.

Published in NEWS Archives
Sunday, 22 June 2014 23:25

Can plants have feelings?

Can plants actually have feelings?
This was the conclusion of Cleve Backster back in the 1960s. He’s the former CIA interrogation specialist that connected polygraph sensors to plants and discovered that they reacted to harm (i.e. cutting their leaves) and even to harmful thoughts of humans in proximity to them.
Backster decided on impulse to attach his polygraph electrodes to the now-famous dracaena in his office, then water the plant and see if the leaves responded. Finding that the plant indeed reacted to this event, he decided to see what would happen if he threatened it, and formed in his mind the idea of lighting a match to the leaf where the electrodes were attached.

And that was when something happened that forever changed Baxter’s life and ours. For the plant didn’t wait for him to light the match. It reacted to his thoughts!

Through further research, Baxter found that it was his intent, and not merely the thought itself, that brought about this reaction.
He also discovered that plants were aware of each other, mourned the death of anything (even the bacteria killed when boiling water is poured down the drain), strongly disliked people who killed plants carelessly or even during scientific research, and fondly remembered and extended their energy out to the people who had grown and tended them, even when their “friends” were far away in both time and space.
In fact, he found, plants can react “in the moment” to events taking place thousands of miles away. And not only are they psychic, they also are prophetic, anticipating negative and positive events, including weather.

One of the most important things that Backster discovered was that, instead of going ballistic, plants that find themselves in the presence of overwhelming danger simply become catatonic! This phenomenon has posed endless problems for those researchers who, unlike Backster, do not respect the sentience of their subjects. Under such circumstances, the plants they are studying evince no reaction whatsoever. They simply “check out.”
Published in NEWS Archives
Tuesday, 10 June 2014 16:40

Brainwave Frequencies

The frequency bands and wave characteristics are described as follows:

Gamma waves (25-60 Hz) appear to relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas, e.g., involving memory, learning abilities, integrated thoughts or information-rich task processing. Gamma rhythms modulate perception and consciousness, which disappear with anaesthesia. Synchronous activity at about 40 Hz appears involved in binding sensory inputs into the single, unitary objects we perceive.

Beta waves (12-25 Hz) dominate our normal waking state of consciousness when attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world. Beta is a "fast" activity, present when we are alert or even anxious, or when engaged in problem solving, judgement, decision making, information processing, mental activity and focus. Nobel Prize winner Sir Francis Crick and other scientists believe the 40 Hz beta frequency may be key to the act of cognition.

Alpha waves (7-12 Hz) are present during dreaming and light meditation when the eyes are closed. As more and more neurons are recruited to this frequency, alpha waves cycle globally across the whole cortex. This induces deep relaxation, but not quite meditation. In alpha, we begin to access the wealth of creativity that lies just below our conscious awareness. It is the gateway, the entry point that leads into deeper states of consciousness. Alpha waves aid overall mental coordination, calmness, alertness, inner awareness, mind/body integration and learning.

Alpha is also the home of the window frequency known as the SR, which propagates with little attenuation around the planet. When we intentionally generate alpha waves and go into resonance with that Earth frequency, we naturally feel better, refreshed, in tune, in synch. It is, in fact, environmental synchronization.

Theta waves (4-7 Hz) occur most often in sleep but are also dominant in the deepest states of meditation (body asleep/mind awake) and thought (gateway to learning, memory). In theta, our senses are withdrawn from the external world and focused on the mindscape -- internally originating signals. Theta waves are associated with mystery, an elusive and extraordinary realm we can explore. It is that twilight state which we normally only experience fleetingly as we rise from the depths of delta upon waking or drifting off to sleep. In theta, we are in a waking dream; vivid imagery flashes before the mind's eye and we are receptive to information beyond our normal conscious awareness. Theta meditation increases creativity, enhances learning, reduces stress and awakens intuition and other extrasensory perception skills.

Delta waves (0-4 Hz) are the slowest but highest in amplitude. They are generated in deepest meditation and dreamless sleep. Delta waves confer a suspension of external existence and provide the most profound feelings of peace. In addition, certain frequencies within the delta range trigger the release of a growth hormone which is beneficial for healing and regeneration. This is why sleep, deep restorative sleep, is so essential to the healing process.

Rhythm & Harmonic Resonance
There is a harmonic relationship between the Earth and our mind/body. Earth's low-frequency iso-electric field, the magnetic field of the Earth and the electrostatic field which emerges from our body are closely interwoven. Our internal rhythms interact with external rhythms, affecting our balance, REM patterns, health, and mental focus. SR waves probably help regulate our bodies' internal clocks, affecting sleep/dream patterns, arousal patterns and hormonal secretion (such as melatonin).

The rhythms and pulsations of the human brain mirror those of the resonant properties of the terrestrial cavity, which functions as a waveguide. This natural frequency pulsation is not a fixed number, but an average of global readings, much like the EEG gives an average of brain-wave readings. SR actually fluctuates, like brain waves, due to geographical location, lightning, solar flares, atmospheric ionisation and daily cycles.

The most important slow rhythm is the daily rhythm sensed directly as the change in light. Rhythms connected with the daily rhythm are called circadian (an example is pineal gland melatonin secretion). Some experiments in the absence of natural light have shown that the basic human "clock" is actually slightly longer than one day (24 hours), and closer to one lunar day (24 hours 50 minutes).

On a slower scale, a strong influence on the Earth is its geomagnetic field, which is influenced by the following periods: the Moon's rotation (29.5 days); the Earth's rotation (365.25 days); sunspot cycles (11 or 22 years); the nutation cycle (18.6 years); the rotation of the planets (88 days to 247.7 years); and the galaxy's rotation cycle (250 million years). Very important rhythms, like hormone secretion and dominant nostril exchange, are in the order of 1-2 hours. In the range of human EEG, we have the Sun's electromagnetic oscillation of 10 Hz, while the Earth/ionosphere system is resonant at frequencies in the theta, alpha, beta-1 (low or slow) and beta-2 (high or fast) bands.

Different species often have internal generators of environmental rhythms, which can be extremely precise, up to 10-4. The frequency of these oscillators is then phase-locked-loop (PLL) synchronised with the natural rhythms. Environmental synchronization sources are often called zeitgebers. The mechanism of optical synchronization can be shown. The presented rhythms should inspire a better understanding of the interaction of internal and external rhythms during specific states of consciousness.

The bioelectrical domain is geared to thalamocortical generation of rhythmic activity. In neurofeedback, what is being trained is the degree of rhythmicity of the thalamocortical regulatory circuitry. Rhythmicity manages the entire range of activation and arousal in the bio-electrical domain. One role advocated for rhythmic activity is that of time binding: the need for harnessing brain electrical activity, which is spatially distributed, while maintaining it as a single entity.

Brain waves indicate the arousal dimension, and arousal mediates a number of conditions. Changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic arousal "tune" the nervous system. Underarousal leads towards unipolar or reactive depression, attention deficit disorder, chronic pain and insomnia. Overarousal is linked with anxiety disorders, sleep onset problems, nightmares, hypervigilance, impulsive behaviour, anger/aggression, agitated depression, chronic nerve pain and spasticity. A combination of underarousal and overarousal causes anxiety and depression as well as ADHD.

Instabilities in certain rhythms can be correlated with tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder, aggressive behaviour, rage, bruxism, panic attacks, bipolar disorder, migraines, narcolepsy, epilepsy, sleep apnoea, vertigo, tinnitus, norexia/bulimia, suicidal ideation and behaviour, PMS, multiple chemical sensitivities, diabetes, hypoglycaemia and explosive behaviour.

The brain responds to inputs at a certain frequency or frequencies. The computer can create wave-form patterns or certain frequencies that compare with the mind's neural signals in terms of mind patterns. If people can control their mind patterns, they can enter different states of being (mental relaxation, study, etc.).

So what happens when the mind is entrained with a sound or vibration that reflects the thought patterns? When the mind responds to certain frequencies and behaves as a resonator, is there a harmonic frequency that the mind vibrates to or can attune to? What does the study of harmonic resonance, sound or vibration have to do with the brain's frequency waves?

Sound waves are examples of periodicity, of rhythm. Sound is measured in cycles per second (hertz or Hz). Each cycle of a wave is, in reality, a single pulse of sound. The average range of hearing for the human ear is somewhere between 16 Hz and 20,000 Hz. We cannot hear extremely low frequencies, but we can perceive them as rhythmic.

Entrainment is the process of synchronisation, where vibrations of one object will cause the vibrations of another object to oscillate at the same rate. External rhythms can have a direct effect on the psychology and physiology of the listener. Slower tempos from 48 to 70 BPMs have been proven to decrease heart and respiratory rates, thereby altering the predominant brain-wave patterns.

Binaural beats are continuous tones of subtly different frequencies, delivered to each ear independently in stereo via headphones. If the left channel's pitch is 100 cycles per second and the right channel's pitch is 108 cycles per second, the difference between the two equals 8 cycles per second. When these sounds are combined, they produce a pulsing tone that waxes and wanes in a "wah wah" rhythm.

Binaural beats are not an external sound; rather, they are subsonic frequencies heard within the brain itself. These frequencies are created as both hemispheres work simultaneously to hear sounds that are pitch-differed by key mathematical intervals (window frequencies). The brain waves respond to these oscillating tones by following them (entrainment), and both hemispheres begin to work together. Communication between the two sides of the brain is associated with flashes of creativity, insight and wisdom.

Alpha-wave biofeedback is considered a consciousness self-regulation technique, while alpha-frequency binaural beat stimulation (frequency-following response) is a passive management technique where cortical potentials entrain to or resonate at the frequency of an external stimulus. Through the self-regulation of specific cortical rhythms, we begin to control those aspects of consciousness associated with that rhythm. When the goal is alpha, either in meditation or in biofeedback, it means entraining with the primary SR.
Published in NEWS Archives
Tuesday, 10 June 2014 16:23

Resonant Frequencies and the Human Brain

One of the great revelations of 20th century science is that all existence can be broken down into simple wave functions. Every photon, energy emission, and elementary particle rings with its own unique wave signature. When we see a color, we are actually seeing a distinct frequency of visible light. When we hear a sound, our eardrums are actually being vibrated by subtle waves in the air molecules around us. Even the neurochemical processes of human consciousness ­ our very thoughts ­ ring with their own distinct wave patterns.

By studying the way that waves interact with other waves, researchers have found that even low-powered oscillations can have enormous effects on standing waves, physical structures, and even the human brain. The principle which describes this particular wavelength interaction is known as resonance. When you resonate with something, you are emitting a wave signature which is "in sync" with it. By applying a constant resonant frequency to a standing wave, you can intensify, reinforce, and prolong the standing frequency of that wave. Researchers posit that by applying these concepts of resonance to waves emitted by the brain, it is possible to induce altered brain states. These current methods of "brainwave entrainment" are based on discoveries made by the 19th century inventor Nikola Tesla ­ the electrical pioneer who developed the alternating current system of electricity that is currently in use all over the world.


Nikola Tesla
Tesla first realized the massive potential of resonant waves in 1898 when he performed a simple experiment with an electromechanical oscillator the size of an alarm clock. He attached the device to an iron pillar that ran down through the center of his lab into the foundation of his building. His plan was to let it simply tap away until he could produce a significant vibration in the pillar. However, Tesla was unaware that the vibrations from the oscillator were being conducted through the iron pillar down into the substructure of the city. Just as earthquakes are normally the strongest at a short distance from their epicenter, nearby buildings shook and windows shattered while Tesla's lab remained unaffected. Without rapid police intervention, Tesla may have let the oscillator run all night as buildings crumbled around him.

In a later experiment using the same principle, Tesla clamped an oscillator to one of the exposed ground floor beams of a half built ten-story steel building. As Tesla told reporters later that day:"In a few minutes, I could feel the beam trembling. Gradually the trembling increased in intensity and extended throughout the whole great mass of steel. Finally, the structure began to creak and weave, and the steel workers came to the ground panic-stricken, believing that there had been an earthquake. Rumors spread that the building was about to fall, and the police reserves were called out. Before anything serious happened, I took off the vibrator, put it in my pocket, and went away. But if I had kept on ten minutes more, I could have laid that building flat in the street. And, with the same vibrator, I could drop the Brooklyn Bridge in less than an hour."

"The principle cannot fail," Tesla would say. He understood that a steady frequency of tiny waves would eventually create enormous ripples if they were timed just right. What Tesla demonstrated was a principle of resonance known as entrainment - the ability of a frequency to cause a less powerful frequency to fall into rhythm simply by placing the two frequency emitters in close proximity. In other words, if you take an electrical oscillator with a power rating of 10 watts that is oscillating at a frequency of 1000 cycles per second (cps), and place it next to an oscillator with a power rating of 1000 watts vibrating at a frequency of 5000 cps, eventually the slower oscillator will be entrained to vibrate at 5000 cps because of the more powerful electromagnetic field created by the 1000 watt oscillator.

Monroe's Big Discovery
Recent research regarding the mind-altering possibilities of Tesla's entrainment principle have been undertaken by Robert Monroe, the founder of The Monroe Institute in Faber, Virginia. A student of engineering and human physiology, Monroe's interest in human consciousness began in 1956 when he set up a small research and development program in his New York based radio company. The research was initially designed to determine the feasibility of learning during sleep, but in 1958, an astonishing result emerged.

By experimenting with the effects of sonic frequencies on the brain, Monroe successfully isolated a little-known state of awareness which was totally separated from the physical body. The research team called it an Out-of-Body Experience or OBE ­ a term which has since become a generic description for many unexplainable mind states. The sonic principle he was using was already known to electronic engineers as binaural beat frequency modulation ­ a key concept used in all radio receivers today. However, it was Monroe who took this idea from the field of radio-electronics and applied it to bioelectronics. He called his discovery Hemispherical Synchronization, or HemiSync for short.

To achieve these novel mind-states, Monroe recorded two channels of audio data using a stereo tape recorder. On one channel he recorded a frequency of 200 cps, and on the other channel he recorded a frequency of 208 cps. When he played the recording back through a pair of stereo headphones, what Monroe discovered was that while one ear heard the 200 cps tone, and the other ear heard the 208 tone, the brain interpreted the tones as an eight cps frequency, and began to entrain itself to that frequency. In other words, the brain could only distinguish the eight cps difference, and this frequency was powerful enough to entrain brainwaves.

The Neural Radio
Normally, the two hemispheres of the brain vibrate at different frequencies, but Monroe discovered that they could be easily synchronized. He also found that when both hemispheres were entrained to vibrate right around eight cps, creativity, intuition, and a tendency towards extrasensory perception all increased dramatically.

Research has shown that the human brain operates at a wide range of frequencies, but generally stays in four major levels of awareness known as beta (13 to 30 cps), alpha (8 to 12 cps), theta (5 to 7 cps), and delta (1 to 4 cps). The highest level is beta, and in this state the brain is active and very awake. This state is usually associated with intellectual thought and verbal expression. When you are talking up a storm, your brain is vibrating between 13 and 30 cps.

The alpha level is the next state down, and it is associated with a much more relaxed, calm, and creative waking state. A nice alpha level can be achieved with a simple meditation of slowing your breathing. As your breathing slows, other body functions including your brain frequencies will begin to relax and slow down. When you are completely relaxed ­ but not yet asleep ­ your brain hums at around 8 to 12 cycles per second. 8 or 9 cps is considered a very creative state, marked with contemplative thought and increased intuition.

Moving down the awareness scale we arrive at the theta frequencies, and a very interesting set of frequencies they are. This 5 to 7 cps range is where dreams, deep hypnosis, ESP, out-of-body projections, channeling, and other odd mind phenomena start to pop up. Somewhere in this range lies what is called the hypnagogic state ­ that twilight-zone of consciousness on the border between being awake and being asleep. This is grey area where conscious and subconscious start to overlap. Most of us only get quick, half-remembered glimpses into this realm as we are going to sleep or waking up. However, with Monroe's techniques of brain entrainment, this theta state can be sonically induced ­ allowing the entrainee to have extended periods of theta exploration.

The last level of brainwave activity is the delta range, and these frequencies are usually only associated with deep, dreamless sleep.

Entrain Your Brain
For those of you who would like to experiment with binaural beat entrainment, you can request a catalog of tapes from the Monroe Institute at the address following this article. Over twenty years of electronic research has enabled the Institute to design hundreds of binaural beat tapes containing as many as a dozen frequencies layered over one another. For the computer-savvy among you, there are also ways to experiment with binaural beat entrainment using a home computer. All you need is a sound card, a modem, and a pair of stereo headphones.

If you have Internet access, you can try downloading audio files of binaural beat frequencies from either Brown Feather's Hideaway (Link No Longer Working) or Brainwave web sites. Both of these sites contain binaural beat frequencies for downloading. The frequencies are denoted by their focus number, such as F1 (focus one), all the way up to F26 (Focus 26). These are designations given by the Monroe Institute to denote the different levels of effects attained by the use of their tapes. Please be aware that the audio files found at this site are simple dual stereo frequencies such as 200 cps and 208 cps, and are not of the same quality as the actual Monroe tapes. For those of you who wish to construct your own multilayered frequencies, there are several programs available for downloading on the net (see Syntrillium's Cool Edit).

For those of you who like to go way out there, you can also try experimenting with a technique called Harmonic Resonance. This involves the entrainment of your brain to resonate with the frequency of any planet in the solar system, even the Sun. More information on this planetary resonance can be found at the Brainwave web site mentioned above, or you could check out a book called Cosmic Octave by Hans Cousto. He is widely regarded as the pioneer of this particular field.

Well boys and girls, there you have it. Thanks to Monroe, the simple principles of resonance and entrainment can now be used to alter your consciousness. Of course, these principles can also be applied to anything which emits a distinct wave frequency ­ which is just about everything there is! Science has yet to top out on the ingenious application of these concepts, and there¹s no reason why you too can't spend endless hours of fun messing around with your brain.

Ron Turmel is a computer consultant. He is currently living in Baltimore MD, but will soon be moving back to his home state of California. He may be reached via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
©Copyright Resonant Media, 2000. All rights reserved.
by Ron Turmel
Issue 1, Summer 1997
Originally published in The Resonance Project

 

 

Published in NEWS Archives
Why “predictive programming” is psychologically implausible
If you think that popular culture – movies, TV, and music – have been kind of samey lately, you’re not alone. Peter Suderman at Slate has proposed that most summer blockbusters follow the same basic formula laid out in a screenwriting book from 2005. Others, though, think that this problem goes back much further, and reflects a sinister conspiracy to indoctrinate the public into accepting a totalitarian future.
 
This is a conspiracy theory called “predictive programming.” It’s the brainchild of a man by the name of Alan Watt, and has been popularised by luminaries of conspiracism like Alex Jones and David Icke, among many others. Here’s how it works.
 
 
What is predictive programming?
Imagine that you’re part of a sinister conspiracy to do a particular thing in the future – let’s say that you’re planning to install GPS trackers in people’s heads in order to cement the government’s control over the population. You’re all set to go: the implanting centres are fully staffed and your bulk order of GPS receivers has come in from FoxConn. But you’re worried about how people will react – will they accept the implants? Will they balk at the legal requirement and take to the streets, risking an overthrow of the totalitarian system you’ve worked so hard to build? What’s a conspirator to do?
This is where predictive programming comes in. According to the theory, you can lay the psychological groundwork for the implantation program by planting images in popular media. For instance, you could sponsor a re-release of the original Total Recall, a film in which Arnold Schwarzenegger has a tracking bug implanted in his head. You could get a puppet TV network to release a new sci-fi TV show depicting a future where everyone has a brain implant. Through this media campaign, people will come to accept brain implants as an inevitability. When the time comes, they will accept them without question.
“Predictive programming is a subtle form of psychological conditioning provided by the media to acquaint the public with planned societal changes to be implemented by our leaders. If and when these changes are put through, the public will already be familiarized with them and will accept them as natural progressions, thus lessening possible public resistance and commotion.” - Alan Watt
 
This is why the pilot episode of The Lone Gunmen featured the attempted destruction of the Twin Towers, why a map in The Dark Knight Rises had a location marked “Sandy Hook,” and why Family Guy had a joke about the Boston Marathon. According to predictive programming theorists, these were all planted within the media in order to prepare the public for these events – events that were planned well in advance by the Powers That Be. When the events happened, people shrugged and went on with their daily lives rather than reacting to them as they otherwise would have.
But it’s not all bad news for the sheeple. By finding common themes in popular culture, we can figure out what they’re planning next. For instance, look at how many science fiction films feature a dystopian future with an evil, totalitarian government – Logan’s Run, Robocop, Starship Troopers, V for Vendetta, Minority Report, The Hunger Games, and so on. This is no coincidence: it’s predictive programming. The conspirators are preparing the world for a totalitarian government takeover.
So that’s the theory of predictive programming. At its heart, it’s a psychological claim. So is it psychologically plausible? I argue that the answer is no. First, social learning theory shows that context is important when presenting something that’s meant to be a model for future behaviour. Second, the supposed outcomes of predicting programming seem to have nothing to do with the methods used. Third, the mechanisms by which predictive programming are supposed to work don’t make nearly as much sense as they seem to. Fourth, neurolinguistic programming, the most commonly cited psychological justification for why predictive programming could be expected to work, has been thoroughly discredited by research. Finally, predictive programming is not very good at actual predictions.
 
 
1. Conflict with social learning theory.
A major component of predictive programming theory is the idea that if someone sees something that they’ve seen depicted in fiction, they react to it with resigned indifference and maybe a half-hearted protest. According to this view, the mere portrayal of some social condition in fiction programs people with the idea that it is inevitable and should not be resisted.
 
To understand why this is implausible, consider one of the most famous psychological experiments of all time: Albert Bandura’s “Bobo Doll” experiments. In this series of studies, Bandura and his team recruited two groups of children. In one group, each child was shown a short film of an adult hitting an inflatable clown doll; in the other group, the adult in the film ignored the Bobo doll. After watching whatever film they were assigned to, each child was then put into a room with a variety of toys, including a Bobo doll. The children who had been shown the aggressive video overwhelmingly mimicked the adult and beat up the doll, while the other group left the doll alone.
What does this mean for predictive programming? It completely debunks the idea that simply portraying something will elicit the same reaction regardless of context. Watching the hero hit the Bobo doll makes us want to do the same. The children’s reaction was driven not by the simple presence of the doll, but by the adult model’s reaction to it. It’s relevant that in nearly every film which is supposedly carrying out predictive programming in aid of some dystopian future government, the dystopian society is seen as evil and resistance is seen as a moral imperative. 
Consider The Hunger Games, a film about a teenage girl rebelling against the totalitarian government that rules the shattered remnants of North America with an iron fist, described by Alex Jones as “one hundred percent predictive programming.” The filmmakers try to make us sympathise with the heroine, her friends, and the downtrodden masses in their fight for freedom. The idea that this would make people less likely to resist a totalitarian government is both baseless and counterintuitive. It flies in the face of half a decade of research on social learning and how we model our own behaviour after the behaviour of others around us. If you were trying to institute an evil world government, would you really want to put it out there that people who fight against evil world governments are the heroes? You could use the same reasoning to say that the Ku Klux Klan hagiography Birth of a Nation was really a way of preparing the world for racial integration and mixed marriages. Portrayal is not endorsement, and attitudes are determined in a more complex way than simple presence versus absence.
One more example. The cheesy 70s sci-fi classic Logan’s Run depicts a dystopian future where people are ceremonially executed upon reaching the age of 30. It’s a favourite of predictive programming theorists who think that it presages a world of enforced population control, even though the world is portrayed as cruel and unjust and the hero of the film ultimately destroys the totalitarian society in question. What’s more, a Google search for “logan’s run” + “obamacare” returns over 110,000 results. Far from accepting the film’s future as an inevitability, people use Logan’s Run as a way to resist that future, to give context to their fears about euthanasia and end-of-life care. This is the opposite of what one would expect to happen if predictive programming were a legitimate phenomenon.
 
 
2. Poorly defined purposes.
Sometimes the supposed point of predictive programming is not to program some sort of large social change like the institution of a totalitarian government, but instead to manage the impact of a particular event. A good example of this is the various lists of popular media “references” to 9/11 before the event – depictions of the Twin Towers exploding, and so on. One article from last year discusses the idea that Independence Day was in fact predictive programming for 9/11 – America having iconic buildings blown up by an alien enemy, a heroic president who fights back with force of arms, Will Smith flying a UFO, and so on. As with the other examples above, predictive programming prevented people from reacting to 9/11; instead, they just accepted it as inevitable and moved on.
An article on InfoWars talks about how the appearance of a 9/11-type government plot in the pilot episode of The Lone Gunmen was a way of discrediting the 9/11 truth movement before it began:
The show was used to subconsciously manipulate people to believe that if these events did actually happen, it would be like a film, not a part of reality, therefore we should not worry too much. Anyone who would dare to say that the Government were responsible for such terrorist attacks would immediately be branded a “lunatic conspiracy theorist, like those guys from the X-Files.” 
But there’s a contradiction here. On the one hand, showing the public a fictional 9/11-type event as an external attack is meant to make them more likely to believe that this is the case. On the other hand, showing them a fictional 9/11-type event as an inside job makes them less likely to believe that this is the case. You can’t have it both ways. Besides, if the point of both of these was to simply stop people from having any reaction at all to 9/11, interpretation aside, then all this programming certainly didn’t do a very good job.
Sometimes the motives are said to be even more obscure. The words “Sandy Hook” appear on a map in a scene in The Dark Knight Rises, for instance. But what would be the purpose of this? Even if you buy that predictive programming in the “prepare the public for social change” sense works, it strains belief to the breaking point to think that a brief appearance of the name of a town in a popular film would somehow prevent people from reacting to a tragedy that takes place there. Moreover, this would contradict all of the Sandy Hook conspiracy theories that allege that the shooting never took place and was a staged hoax meant to provoke a reaction from gun-control advocates. Mind-controlling people not to react to it would be totally counterproductive. So what would be the point?
This is where things get a little weird. Alan Watt, when writing about the reasons for predictive programming, said that “legally, they must tell you what they’re doing. And they do – all the time.” James Farganne reasons that the conspirators’ “own belief system seems to mandate that they notify their victims.” At this point, claims about predictive programming cease to be psychological so it’d be off-topic to deal with them in any sort of rigorous way.
 
 
3. Implausible psychological mechanisms.
The basic idea of predictive programming is that seeing something portrayed in popular media will prevent people from reacting to the same event when it happens in their own lives. Rather than resisting it, they will accept it and move on. This is something that people are not aware of – they are persuaded unconsciously, subliminally, without their knowledge or consent.
In fact, there has been a good amount of psychological research on subliminal persuasion. For instance, Karremans, Stroebe, and Klaus (2006) showed that subliminally showing people the name of a drink will increase the chance that they’ll pick that drink when presented with a choice – but only if they’re thirsty. However, this body of research conflicts with the idea of predictive programming on a number of counts. For instance, the core idea of predictive programming is that showing people things in fiction will prevent them from reacting to them in real life, and that the tone of the portrayal doesn’t matter. However, subliminal priming research shows the importance of positive or negative emotions – for instance, Sweeny, Grabowecky, Suzuki, and Paller (2009) showed people a series of surprised-looking faces. Unbeknownst to the participants in the study, they were also subliminally shown fearful, happy, or neutral faces along with the surprised ones. Participants remembered the surprised faces better, and rated them more positively, when they were matched with subliminal happy faces. This study, and others like it, make it implausible that portraying something in a positive or negative light doesn’t affect how it’s perceived.
 
Then again, things like the government in The Hunger Games and the age-based euthanasia in Logan’s Run are hardly subliminal – they’re major plot points. It’s questionable whether they would have “subliminal” effects at all. So if predictive programming doesn’t work subliminally, how is it supposed to work? One possible candidate is the “mere exposure” effect – showing people a pleasant or neutral stimulus repeatedly will lead them to like it more and more over time. This is a well-established effect in psychology, and works even when the stimuli are not consciously perceived. However, and importantly for predictive programming, this doesn’t work for negative stimuli. In fact, Perlman and Oskamp (1970) showed that repeatedly showing people in negative settings makes participants’ evaluations of those people harsher – they became more and more disliked over time. This is a knockout blow for the idea that repeatedly presenting a type of government or social policy in a negative light would somehow prevent people from feeling bad about it. In fact, based on what we know about the mere exposure effect, it would make things worse.
 
4. Pseudoscientific underpinnings.
Many of the people who traffic in predictive programming cite neurolinguistic programming (NLP) as a scientific-sounding basis for claims about its effects, or even use the two terms interchangeably – in the sense of “OMG look at this NLP / PREDICTIVE PROGRAMMING in the new James Bond movie!!” NLP, at least originally, was a generally well-specified psychological theory that made specific predictions. Other than the idea that both of them are supposed to do vaguely spooky things to your brain, however, there’s no clear link between NLP and predictive programming.
But let’s imagine that there is some consistent, NLP-based justification for predictive programming as a theory. The problem with this is that despite its popularity on the Internet, NLP has been systematically discredited as a theory of thought and behaviour – while it makes fairly straightforward predictions about counselling, learning, and eye movement, for instance, these ideas simply don’t pan out when examined empirically (see Sharpley, 1987, and Sturt et al., 2012, for reviews). There is simply no consistent evidence that NLP works – its predictions haven’t panned out after decades of testing. Proposing that predictive programming is consistent with NLP principles doesn’t do the former any favours. Building a theory of mind control on NLP is like building a castle on top of quicksand.
 
5. Lack of predictive validity.
But what’s the track record of predictive programming itself as a theory? As expressed by Alan Watt, predictive programming is a relatively straightforward theory. Seeing something portrayed in fiction makes people more likely to shrug and accept it when it comes along in real life. While Watt and other proponents mostly apply it to large social changes and world events, there’s no reason why it shouldn’t apply equally to things on a smaller scale – getting fired from your job, having your partner cheat on you, getting bilked out of money, and so on. These are predictions that are easily amenable to empirical research, and I’d very much like to do a study on this subject sometime to see if the predictions of the theory stand up.
However, there is already a track record of predictions in the theory’s traditional domains. Despite the name, predictive programming has not done very well when it comes to actually predicting things. In theory, you’re supposed to be able to see what They are up to by looking at what’s going on in popular media. This is meant to give an idea of what the conspirators are psychologically preparing the population for. Indeed, after some event like 9/11, people will inevitably go back and find things in the media that seem to match up. But efforts to go the other way – to predict things in advance based on what’s in the media – fall completely flat.
Three examples come immediately to mind: the Simpsons clock fiasco, the Comet Elenin panic, and the London Olympics false-flag-that-wasn’t. The Simpsons clock fiasco happened a couple of years ago when an episode of the long-running TV show featured a giant clock exploding and landing next to a sleeping Homer Simpson, who subsequently wakes up, yawns, stretches, and walks off camera. Predictive programming enthusiasts made much of the position of the hands on the clock (supposedly indicating a date), the way Homer stretched when he got up from his hammock (“obvious masonic hand gestures”, opined one Youtube commenter), the importance of clock faces in Project Monarch, the nuclear-looking explosion, and so on. Of course, none of the predictions of doom came to pass. The Comet Elenin panic was an even weirder example, where a set of coincidences led predictive programming enthusiasts to believe that the film Deep Impact was made in order to condition people to accept an extinction-level impact from the eponymous comet. The comet disintegrated while passing through the solar system in August 2011 and killed absolutely nobody. Finally, pretty much everyone who was into predictive programming thought that there would be a false-flag attack of some kind at the 2012 Olympics in London (particularly Ian R. Crane) – but the Olympics in general, went off without a hitch.
The “predictive” element of predictive programming is really retrodictive – it can’t be used to predict in advance what’s going to happen, any more than flipping a coin or reading bird entrails. There are a couple of possible reasons for this – either the conspirators are putting out fake “programming” in order to throw people off the trail (which decreases the chance that there’s any signal getting through all the noise), the programming is so arcane that it’s impossible to pick it out except after the fact (which makes it less plausible that it’s having any prospective effect on us), or the apparent cases of predictive programming are nothing more than the result of hunting for vague resemblances after the fact.
 
Conclusions
Clearly there are a lot of reasons to believe that predictive programming probably doesn’t work: it runs counter to one of the foundational experiments in social psychology, its effects and aims are vague and poorly defined, it doesn’t agree with decades of psychological research on mere exposure and subliminal persuasion, its “scientific” justification is completely unsupported by research, and the predictions made by its advocates simply don’t pan out.
However, predictive programming is amenable to research. There’s nothing stopping someone from putting it to the test – I would like to do this myself at some point. Get two groups of participants, like in the Bobo Doll study. While one group watches neutral videos, the other watches a series of videos where people get cheated out of things: a gambler loses money in a rigged poker game, a business deal with a corrupt politician goes bad, a bank wrongly forecloses on a mortgage and puts a family out on the streets. The participants are then put in an economic game scenario where someone else behaves unfairly, and they have the opportunity to punish them. If predictive programming works, the people who were exposed to fictional depictions of cheating should be less likely to punish the other person – rather than resisting, they’ll simply accept what happens. How do you think this experiment would turn out?
Saturday, 03 May 2014 18:07

Page 4: Freakscience - Ufology

Today we introduce THE FREAKY SCIENCE. Otherwise how can we name a field that based only on unexciting evidences, doubtful facts and hallucinations? But we think that all this parts are real and proved by our knowledge and trust in Aliens. If it will be School subject, definitely it will be our favourite. So, here we go with the short introduction in UFOLOGY
 
 
 
UFOLOGY
According to Wikipedia, Ufology is is the array of subject matter and activities associated with an interest in unidentified flying objects (UFOs). UFOs have been subject to various investigations over the years by governments, independent groups, and scientists. The term derives from UFO, which is pronounced as an acronym, and the suffix -logy, which comes from the Ancient Greek λογία (logiā).
 
The acronym UFO - for Unidentified Flying Object - is so prevalent and commonplace today, that it's easy to forget the term is not even fully fifty years old yet. There is even some dispute about the acronym's exact origin. In his classic account of his years spent as the director of Project Blue Book - the Air Force's official UFO "investigation" agency - Capt. Edward J. Ruppelt says unequivocally that "UFO is the official term that I created to replace the words 'flying saucers'" (Report on Unidentified Flying Objects, Doubleday, 1956, p. 6). Presumably, this would have been sometime between 1951, when Ruppelt took over Project Grudge, later renamed Blue Book, and September of 1953, when he left the agency and the Air Force. Elsewhere in the same book, however, Ruppelt says of Project Grudge's final 600-page report, released in December of 1949, that it was "officially titled 'Unidentified Flying Objects - Project Grudge, Technical Report No. 102-AC-49/15-100. But it was widely referred to as the Grudge Report." This would mean that some long forgotten anonymous Air Force staffer coined the phrase at least two years before Ruppelt did. But perhaps Ruppelt is only claiming credit for the coinage of the acronym itself?
 
At any rate, UFO has now entered into common usage and appears in most dictionaries, along with ufology, the study of UFOs, and ufologist, one who studies UFOs. In many ways, the term is a "loaded" one in that it implies classification or designation prior to a proper analysis or thorough investigation. As commonly employed, UFO has also come to imply a spaceship, or vehicle, of extraterrestrial manufacture and origin. In reality, well over 90 percent of all reported UFOs prove to be IFOs - Identified Flying Objects - upon investigation. IFOs can be anything from distant airplane landing lights to the planet Venus, with ball lightning, weather balloons, and other astronomical and meteorological phenomena thrown in for good measure.
 
 
In strictest terms, a UFO is just that - an apparent unidentified flying object, origin unknown. The best scientifically accepted definition of a UFO is probably that provided by the late astronomer J. Allen Hynek, who said that the UFO is simply "the reported perception of an object or light seen in the sky or upon the land the appearance, trajectory, and general dynamic and luminescent behavior of which do not suggest a logical, conventional explanation and which is not only mystifying to the original percipients but remains unidentified after close scrutiny of all available evidence by persons who are technically capable of making a common sense identification, if one is possible." (The UFO Experience: A Scientific Inquiry by J. Allen Hynek, Henry Regnery, Chicago, 1972, p. 10.) For more than 20 years, Hynek was the Air Force's astronomy consultant to Project Blue Book and its predecessors, up until the former's closing on December 17, 1969. A few years afterwards, Hynek formed the Center for UFO Studies that now bears his name. He also contributed two other terms - one inadvertently and one purposefully - to the popular lexicon: "swamp gas" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." Shortly before the UFO there was the flying saucer. On June 24th, 1947, private pilot Kenneth Arnold was winging his way near Mt. Rainier in Washington state, when he spied nine, shiny crescent-shaped objects at some distance and traveling at speeds he estimated to be well over 1,000 mph, far in advance of any known terrestrial craft of the time, the new jet technology included. Arnold told Associated press reporter Bill Bequette that the objects behaved like a rock or saucer skipping across water. An anonymous headline writer then coined the phrase "flying saucers" to describe what Arnold had seen, even though the objects he reported were crescent, not saucer, shaped.
 
 
By any name, however, flying saucers and UFOs have continued to puzzle us in the half-century since the end of WWII. Once regarded as almost exclusively an American phenomenon, like hamburgers and baseball, UFOs have now been reported from virtually every country in the world. No classification or category of humanity, from the average man or woman in the street, to physicists and astronomers, is immune to the UFO phenomenon. According to a several-decades-old Gallup Poll, more than ten million American adults alone are estimated to have seen what they believed to be a UFO, a phenomenon that most skeptics routinely dismiss as non-existent by definition. In reality, whatever that reality is, UFOs are arguably the most widely reported unexplained mystery of this or any other century.
 
Although the modern UFO era is typically dated to Arnold's landmark 1947 sighting, there is tantalizing evidence that the heavens have long been inhabited by similar "apparitions" and manifestations, even when there weren't handy words with which to describe them. The collected books of Charles Fort (1874-1932), sometimes considered the father of ufology, run to 1062 pages. In the whole, there is but a single illustration, a line drawing on page 280 of The Book of the Damned (his first book) that accompanies an account Fort culled from the pages of the Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. The account was an extract from the log of Capt. F. W. Banner aboard the bark Lady of the Lake, dated March 22nd, 1870. Sailors had seen a remarkable object, or "cloud," which they reported to the ship's captain. "According to Capt. Banner," Fort wrote, "it was a cloud of circular form, with an included semicircle divided into four parts, the central dividing shaft beginning at the centre of the circle and extending far outward, and then curving backward."
 
The thing was light grey in color and much lower than the other clouds. It "traveled from a point at about 20 degrees above the horizon to a point about 80 degrees above," moving from the south, southeast, where it first appeared, to the northeast, traveling against the wind. "For half an hour this form was visible," writes Fort. "When it did finally disappear [it] was not because it disintegrated like a cloud, but because it was lost to sight in the evening darkness."
Aside from the extraordinary duration - most UFO sightings are a matter of minutes or seconds - this 1870 event replicates many of the characteristics common to UFO sightings more than a century later. These include the circular shape, the gray, metallic color and the ability to travel against the wind, which would seemingly rule out such mundane sources as weather balloons and - the skeptics' favorite - airborne hoaxes of a hot-air nature, i.e., kites or plastic bags with candles attached. Needless to say, any reliable 1870 or earlier sighting would also rule out the easy IFO "explanations" of airplane landing lights, satellites, advertising blimps and so on.
 
 
While it is true that rumour, speculation and tabloid sensationalism surround the UFO subject, it is with the collection, analysis and verification, as far as possible, of sober reports like the above that MUFON and other responsible UFO organizations are most concerned. The phenomenon can and should be approached dispassionately and scientifically from a variety of angles, perceptual, psychological and sociological, to name but a few. If objects from another planet are indeed visiting ours, what form of propulsion system and other technologies are employed? What kinds of biological lifeforms might be onboard? What God or gods will they worship? And how will UFO occupants - now or in the future, immediate or remote - perceive humans: as mental, emotional and spiritual equals or as vastly subpar inferiors? Should the sceptics prove right, in a "worst-case" scenario, and UFOs turn out to be nothing more than a convoluted space age myth of our own making, surely our perceptions of the UFO phenomenon will tell us much about the contents and inner working, the built-in "plumbing" of the human mind and perhaps consciousness itself? In either event - including other scenarios and potential explanations as yet unformulated - many unanswered questions remain. It can hardly be against human nature, or the scientific method in principle, to ask and to seek answers to those questions.
Saturday, 26 April 2014 10:34

Page 4: Freakscience - the Drop city

Today we give the Weird Knowledge sector to one of the important fields of the science that more or less putting our brain cells into the chronologic order. We mean History of course.
We like it, because it also gives us some information that is shockingly unknown and lost in time. And as we are talking today about Communes, we have extracted from Hippie’s Oblivion the story of the lost City .
In today’s world, it’s a concept that sounds like the basis for a reality show cooked up under the careful eye of Armani-wearing big wigs: Throw a bunch of artists together and see if they can live away from society, nourished solely by their creative juices.
But back in 1965, this scenario was more real than any “reality” show ever would be.
Back then, it was an actual place. Located in south-central Colorado, it wasn’t on the grid, wasn’t for profit and wasn’t like anything yet to be seen (though it would be heavily copied).
 
It was DROP CITY
Referred to as the first hippie commune, this tight community of DIY geometric domes was grounded in a heady counter-culture combination of self-sufficiency, art and invention.
In 1965, the four original founders, Gene Bernofsky ("Curly"), JoAnn Bernofsky ("Jo"), Richard Kallweit ("Lard") and Clark Richert ("Clard"), art students and filmmakers from the University of Kansas and University of Colorado, bought a 7-acre (28,000 m2) tract of land about four miles (6 km) North of Trinidad, in southeaster Colorado. Their intention was to create a live-in work of Drop Art, continuing an art concept they had developed earlier at the University of Kansas. Drop Art (sometimes called "droppings") was informed by the "happenings" of Allan Kaprow and the impromptu performances, a few years earlier, of John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, and Buckminster Fuller, at Black Mountain College.
 
As Drop City gained notoriety in the 1960s underground, people from around the world came to stay and work on the construction projects. Inspired by the architectural ideas of Buckminster Fuller and Steve Baer, residents constructed domes and zonohedra to house themselves, using geometric panels made from the metal of automobile roofs and other inexpensive materials. In 1967 the group, now consisting of 10 core people, won Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion award for their constructions. The Firesign Theatre folks had a commercial ~"kids, tear the top off your daddy's car, and send it, together with 10 cents in cash or coin, to Drop City, Colorado..."
 
The community grew in reputation and size, accelerated by media attention, including news reports on national television networks. The peak of Drop City's fame was the Joy Festival in June 1967, which attracted hundreds of hippies, some of whom stayed on. With the complex of eight domes and geometric buildings constructed, Curly and Jo, the only official owners of the property, signed it over to a non-profit corporation consisting of the entire core group (then about a dozen). The deed stipulated that the land was "forever free and open to all people".
 
But tensions and personality conflicts were already a problem within the group, and soon became unbearable. By the end of 1968, some of the original occupants of the community had moved to Boulder, Colorado to start an artists' cooperative, "Criss-Cross", whose purpose, like Drop City's, was to function in a "synergetic" interaction between peers (no bosses) to create experimental artistic innovation. Among the innovative endeavors to evolve out of Drop City are:
in 1969, the early solar energy company – Zomeworks, in Albuquerque, NM;
the artists' group "Criss-Cross", operative in New York and Colorado in the 1970s;
the development of the "61-Zone System" by ZomeTool of Boulder, Colorado;
and in the early 1980s, an important discovery of a cubic fusion of interpenetrating fractal tetrahedra by Richard Kallweit.
 
Legacy
By 1970, many intentional communities had developed in Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico, some of which were inspired by Drop City. Libre, north of Gardner, Colorado was founded by several ex-"Droppers", and was among the more well known. Some communities continue to exist in some form today (notably in the Taos, NM area).
At Drop City, debris and building remnants from the original settlement remain at the site today, though it is not inhabited. By 1977 it was abandoned, and the members of the non-profit who were still in touch decided to sell off the site to the cattle rancher next door. The last of the iconic domes was taken down only in the late 1990s, by a truck repair facility which now occupies a portion of the site.
Today we publish few interviews on Multiverse Theory.
These videos are definitely not for those psy animals, who are watching our site just to be informed about the parties. Open your mind for scientific discussions and deep matter understanding.

 
 
 

 

In our past editions we have paid a lot of attention to this sector. Science is important source of our alternative global knowledge. Especially because we are observing mainly the abnormal freaky researches and materials. And today finally is the time of PHYSICS.

So, let’s check how Freaky Physicians Prove Than Parallel Universes Exist.
 
 
Look past the details of a wonky discovery by a group of California scientists -- that a quantum state is now observable with the human eye -- and consider its implications: Time travel may be feasible. Doc Brown would be proud.
 
The strange discovery by quantum physicists at the University of California Santa Barbara means that an object you can see in front of you may exist simultaneously in a parallel universe -- a multi-state condition that has scientists theorizing that traveling through time may be much more than just the plaything of science fiction writers.
And it's all because of a tiny bit of metal -- a "paddle" about the width of a human hair, an item that is incredibly small but still something you can see with the naked eye. UC Santa Barbara's Andrew Cleland cooled that paddle in a refrigerator, dimmed the lights and, under a special bell jar, sucked out all the air to eliminate vibrations. He then plucked it like a tuning fork and noted that it moved and stood still at the same time.
 
That sounds contradictory, and it's nearly impossible to understand if your last name isn't Einstein. But it actually happened. It's a freaky fact that's at the heart of quantum mechanics.
 
How Is That Possible?
To even try to understand it, you have to think really, really small. Smaller than an atom. Electrons, which circle the nucleus of an atom, are swirling around in multiple states at the same time -- they're hard to pin down. It's only when we measure the position of an electron that we force it to have a specific location. Cleland's breakthrough lies in taking that hard-to-grasp yet true fact about the atomic particle and applying it to something visible with the naked eye.
 
What does it all mean? Let's say you're in Oklahoma visiting your aunt. But in another universe, where your atomic particles just can't keep up, you're actually at home watching "The Simpsons." That may sound far-fetched, but it's based on real science.
 
"When you observe something in one state, one theory is it split the universe into two parts," Cleland told FoxNews.com, trying to explain how there can be multiple universes and we can see only one of them. The multi-verse theory says the entire universe "freezes" during observation, and we see only one reality. You see a soccer ball flying through the air, but maybe in a second universe the ball has dropped already. Or you were looking the other way. Or they don't even play soccer over there.
Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology and a popular author, accepts the scientific basis for the multi-verse -- even if it cannot be proven: "Unless you can imagine some super-advanced alien civilization that has figured this out, we aren't affected by the possible existence of other universes," Carroll said. But he does think "someone could devise a machine that lets one universe communicate with another."
 
It all comes down to how we understand time. Carroll suggests that we don't exactly feel time -- we perceive its passing. For example, time moves fast on a rollercoaster and very slowly during a dull college lecture. It races when you're late for work . . . but the last few minutes before quitting time seem like hours.
 
Back to the Future
"Time seems to be a one-way street that runs from the past to the present," says Fred Alan Wolf, a.k.a. Dr. Quantum, a physicist and author. "But take into consideration theories that look at the level of quantum fields ... particles that travel both forward and backward in time. If we leave out the forward-and-backwards-in-time part, we miss out on some of the physics." Wolf says that time -- at least in quantum mechanics -- doesn't move straight like an arrow. It zig-zags, and he thinks it may be possible to build a machine that lets you bend time. Consider Sergei Krikalev, the Russian astronaut who flew six space missions. Richard Gott, a physicist at Princeton University, says Krikalev aged 1/48th of a second less than the rest of us because he orbited at very high speeds. And to age less than someone means you've jumped into the future -- you did not experience the same present. In a sense, he says, Krikalev time-traveled to the future -- and back again!
 
"Newton said all time is universal and all clocks tick the same way," Gott says. "Now with Einstein's theory of Special Relativity we know that travel into the future is possible. With Einstein's theory of gravity, the laws of physics as we understand them today suggest that even time travel to the past is possible in principle. But to see whether time travel to the past can actually be realized we may have to learn new laws of physics that step in at the quantum level."
 
And for that, you start with a very tiny paddle in a bell jar.
Cleland has proved that quantum mechanics scale to slightly larger sizes. The next challenge is to learn how to control quantum mechanics and use it for even larger objects. Do so -- and we might be able to warp to parallel universes just by manipulating a few electrons.
"Our concepts of cause and effect will fly out the window," says Ben Bova, the science fiction author. "People will -- for various reasons -- try to fix the past or escape into the future. But we may never notice these effects, if the universe actually diverges. Maybe somebody already has invented a time machine and our history is being constantly altered, but we don’t notice the kinks in our path through time."

 

We have a lot of positive feedback about our last week issue dedicated to Dr. Stanislav Grof. Surprisingly, quite difficult material on Transpersonal Psychology was one of the most visited articles since we have this section in our magazine. So, following the interests and requirements of our readers and today's main theme, we will continue with very interesting scientific research that will make you understand many things . We hope…
 
 
PSYCHOLOGY OF HAPPINESS
 
To psychological researchers, happiness is life experience marked by a preponderance of positive emotion. Feelings of happiness and thoughts of satisfaction with life are two prime components of subjective well-being (SWB). The scientific pursuit of happiness and positive emotion is also the first pillar of the new positive psychology first proposed in Martin E. P. Seligman's 1998 American Psychological Association presidential address. Positive psychologists also study positive character strengths and virtues and positive social institutions.
 
Assessing Happiness
Psychologists assess people's happiness with varied measures. The simplest is a single item that has been posed to hundreds of thousands of representatively sampled people in many countries: "Taken all together, how would you say things are these days─would you say you are very happy, pretty happy, or not too happy?"
Other investigators employ multi-item happiness measures. Some tap into the "cognitive" component of happiness (i.e., judgments of high life satisfaction) and others assess the "affective" component (i.e., the experience of frequent positive emotions and relatively infrequent negative emotions). For example, the popular Satisfaction With Life Scale asks respondents five questions about their feelings regarding their lives (e.g., "In most ways my life is close to my ideal.") Other measures assess the affective component of happiness in different ways. The Affect Balance Scale invites people to report how frequently they have experienced various positive and negative emotions over the last 30 days. The Experience Sampling Method uses a pager to occasionally interrupt people's waking experience and to sample their moods, and the Day Reconstruction Method requires respondents to review their previous day hour by hour and to recall exactly what they were doing and how they were feeling during each hour.
Multi-item global measures of happiness are also frequently used by researchers. The Subjective Happiness Scale asks people to rate the extent to which they believe themselves to be happy or unhappy individuals (e.g., "In general, I consider myself...," with the options being somewhere between "not a very happy person" and "a very happy person").
 
How Happy are People?
Contrary to many reports of abundant misery ("Our pains greatly exceed our pleasures," said Rousseau), most people report being "fairly" or "very" happy and relatively few (some 1 in 10 in many countries, including the USA) report being "not too happy." Pioneering happiness researcher Ed Diener aggregated SWB data from 916 surveys of 1.1 million people in 45 nations that represent most of the human population. When responses were converted to a 0 to 10 scale (with 5 being neutral), the average SWB score was near 7.
 
Likewise, when people’s moods have been sampled using pagers or in national surveys, most people report being in good rather than bad moods.
These generally positive self-reports come from people of all ages and both sexes worldwide, with a few exceptions: people hospitalized for alcoholism, newly incarcerated inmates, new therapy clients, South African blacks during the apartheid era, homeless people, sex workers, and students living under conditions of political suppression.
When surveyed, there is some tendency for people to overreport good things (such as voting) and underreport bad things (such as smoking). Yet people’s SWB reports have reasonable reliability across time and correlate with other positive indicators of well-being, including friends' and family members' assessments. Positive self-reports also predict sociability, energy, and helpfulness, and a lower risk for abuse, hostility, and illness.
Happiness does, however, vary somewhat by country. Recent World Values Survey data collected by Ronald Inglehart from 82 countries indicate highest SWB (happiness and life satisfaction) in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Denmark, Ireland, Iceland, and Switzerland, and the lowest in Moldova, Russia, Armenia, Ukraine, Zimbabwe, and Indonesia.
 
Who is Happy?
Despite presumptions of happy and unhappy life stages or populations, there are mostly happy and a few unhappy people in every demographic group. Happiness is similarly common among people of differing.
 
age: Emotionality subsides with maturity and happiness predictors change with age (as satisfaction with health, for example, becomes more important). Yet World Values Surveys indicate comparable SWB reports across the lifespan. For example, self-reported happiness does not nosedive during men's supposed early 40s "midlife crisis" years or parents' supposed "empty nest syndrome" years.
 
gender: There are gender gaps in misery: When troubled, men more often become alcoholic, women more often ruminate and get depressed or anxious. Yet in many surveys worldwide, women and men have been similarly likely to declare themselves "very happy" and "satisfied" with life.
 
race: African-Americans are only slightly less likely than European-Americans to report feeling very happy. Moreover, note social psychologists Jennifer Crocker and Brenda Major, "A host of studies conclude that blacks have levels of self-esteem equal to or higher than that of whites." People in disadvantaged groups maintain self-esteem by valuing the things at which they excel, by making comparisons within their own groups, and by attributing problems to external sources such as prejudice.
 
The traits of happy people: Extraversion, self-esteem, optimism, and a sense of personal control are among the marks of happy lives. Twin and adoption studies reveal that some of these traits, such as extraversion, are genetically influenced, as is happiness itself. Like cholesterol level, happiness is genetically influenced, yet also somewhat amenable to volitional control.
 
The work and leisure of happy people: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi reports increased quality of life when work and leisure engage one's skills. Between the anxiety of being overwhelmed and the boredom of being underwhelmed lies the unself-conscious, absorbed state of flow.
 
The relationships of happy people: Humans are social animals, with an evident need to belong. For most people, solitary confinement is misery. Having close friends, and being with them, is pleasure. In National Opinion Research Center surveys of more than 42,000 Americans since 1972, 40 percent of married adults have declared themselves very happy, as have 23 percent of never married adults. The marital happiness gap also occurs in other countries and is similar for men and women. The causal arrows between marriage and happiness appear to point both ways: an intimate marriage, like other close friendships, offers social support; but happy people also appear more likely to attract and retain partners.
 
The faith of happy people: The same National Opinion Research Center surveys reveal that 23 percent of those never attending religious services report being very happy, as do 47 percent of those attending more than weekly. In explaining the oft-reported greater happiness and ability to cope with loss among people active in faith communities, psychologists have assumed that faith networks may offer social support, meaning, and assistance in managing the "terror" of one's inevitable death.
 
Wealth and Well-Being
In the early 21st century, economists and environmental sustainability advocates came to share psychologists' interest in the extent to which money and consumption can buy happiness. Three in four entering American college and university students (in annual UCLA surveys) say that it is "very important or essential" to "be very well off financially," and 73 percent of Americans in 2006 answered "yes" when Gallup asked "Would you be happier if you made more money?"
 
In their scientific pursuit of happiness, psychologists and sociologists have asked three questions:
 
Are people happier if they live in rich countries? There is some tendency for prosperous nations to have happier and more satisfied people (though these also tend to be countries with high literacy, civil rights, and stable democracies). But the correlation between national wealth and well-being tapers off above a certain level.
 
Within any country, are rich people happier? Although many researchers have found the correlation between personal income and happiness "surprisingly weak" (as Ronald Inglehart report in 1990), recent surveys indicate that across individuals as across nations, the relationship is curvilinear: the association between income and happiness tapers off once people have sufficient income to afford life's necessities and a measure of control over their lives.
 
Does the happiness of a people rise over time with rising affluence? The answer is plainly no. Americans love what their grandparents of a half century ago seldom knew: air conditioning, the Internet, MP3 players, and bigger houses. Yet they are no happier. The same is true in other countries, economist Richard Easterlin has reported. Economic growth in affluent countries has not demonstrably improved human morale. Ditto China, where Gallup surveys since 1994 reveal huge increases in households with color TV and telephones, but somewhat diminished life satisfaction. Such results have led Ed Diener and Martin Seligman to collaborate with the Census Bureau in devising new "national indicators of subjective well-being."
 
Psychologists have sought to explain why objective life circumstances -- especially positive experiences -- have such modest long-term influence on happiness. One explanation is our human capacity for adaptation. Sooner than we might expect, people will adapt to improvements in circumstances and recalibrate their emotions around a new "adaptation level." Thus, finds Daniel Gilbert in his studies, summarized in Stumbling on Happiness, emotions have a shorter half-life than most people suppose. Nevertheless, some psychologists, such as Sonja Lyubomirsky and her colleagues, draw from happiness research in designing interventions that aim to increase happiness.
Happiness reflects not only our adaptations to recent experiences but also our social comparisons. As people climb the ladder of success, they tend to compare upward. And with increasing income inequality, as in contemporary China, there will likely be more available examples of better off people with whom to compare. In experiments, people engaged in comparing downward─by comparing themselves with those impoverished or disfigured─express greater satisfaction with their own lives.
 
References
Daniel Gilbert, Stumbling on Happiness, Knopf, 2006
Jonathan Haidt, The Happiness Hypothesis, Basic Books, 2006
David G. Myers, The Pursuit of Happiness, Harper Paperbacks, 1993.
Martin E. P. Seligman, Authentic Happiness, Free Press, 2002.
Ed Diener and Robert Biswas-Diener, Rethinking happiness: The science of psychological wealth, Malden, MA: Blackwell/Wiley, 2009.
Sonja Lyubomirsky, The How of Happiness,Penguin Press, 2008.
Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity: TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY
 
 
We have passed through several branches of World’s Classic Science, trying to assimilate our trippy knowledge to the recognized and accepted disciplines. Today we will not change our direction and our honour is to present here the deepest, widest, craziest and closest to psychedelic consciousness field - PSYCHOLOGY.
But no, no, no! We will not make you tired with some random bullshit for nerds. We will inject this information straight to your brain. Read it and open your mind!
 
Apart of all fantastic researches, discovers and new knowledge, Stanislav Grof is one of the founders and chief theoreticians of Transpersonal Psychology and received an Honorary Award for major contributions to and development of the field of Transpersonal Psychology from the Association for Transpersonal Psychology in 1993. Dr. Grof is also the founding President of the International Transpersonal Association (ITA) and was its President for many years. So, obviously we will try to make you understand what is exactly….
TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY
 
Transpersonal psychology is a school of psychology that integrates the spiritual and transcendent aspects of the human experience with the framework of modern psychology. It is also possible to define it as a "spiritual psychology". The Transpersonal has been defined as "experiences in which the sense of identity or self extends beyond (trans) the individual or personal to encompass wider aspects of humankind, life, psyche or cosmos”
Issues considered in transpersonal psychology include spiritual self-development, self beyond the ego, peak experiences, mystical experiences, systemic trance, spiritual crises, spiritual evolution, religious conversion and altered states of consciousness, spiritual practices, and other sublime and/or unusually expanded experiences of living. The discipline attempts to describe and integrate spiritual experience within modern psychological theory and to formulate new theory to encompass such experience.
 
Transpersonal Psychology might loosely be called the psychology of spirituality and of those areas of the human mind which search for higher meanings in life, and which move beyond the limited boundaries of the ego to access an enhanced capacity for wisdom, creativity, unconditional love and compassion. It honours the existence of transpersonal experiences, and is concerned with their meaning for the individual and with their effect upon behaviour.
Traditional psychology is interested in a continuum of human experience and behaviour ranging from severe dysfunction, mental and emotional illness at one end, to what is generally considered “normal”, healthy behaviour at the other end and various degrees of normal and maladjustment in between. While an exact definition of Transpersonal Psychology is the subject of debate, Transpersonal Psychology is a full spectrum psychology that encompasses all of this and then goes beyond it by adding a serious scholarly interest in the immanent and transcendent dimensions of human experience: exceptional human functioning, experiences, performances and achievements, true genius, the nature and meaning of deep religious and mystical experiences, non-ordinary states of consciousness, and how we might foster the fulfilment of our highest potentials as human beings.
 
Transpersonal psychology combines a variety of approaches in psychology, including behaviourism, cognitive psychology and humanistic psychology, along with other disciplines, including Eastern and Western philosophy, mysticism, mindfulness and the world’s religions.
 
Below are six other facts about transpersonal psychology, from the therapist’s role in psychotherapy to transpersonal psychology’s history as a field.
 
1. Transpersonal psychology doesn’t have specific tools or methods.
 
“Transpersonal psychotherapy is rooted in an ideology and a basic humility that operates behind the scenes,” said psychotherapist, author and teacher Jeffrey Sumber. “It is less about a particular tool or methodology and more about an intention that motivates the intervention,” he said.
 
2. Relationships in transpersonal psychology are the key.
 
According to Sumber, “Transpersonal Psychology is an approach to understanding the way our minds operate through our relationships with others, resting in the belief that there is something bigger and deeper in the space between which operates upon us.” The relationship between client and therapist is just as important as the client’s other relationships. “… The space between therapist and client is as sacred and transformative as that space between the client and their issues, their families and friends, etc.,” he said. And both people change as a result of this relationship. As Sumber writes on his website, “…in order for positive change to occur for the client, it must also occur for the therapist on some level, by and through the bonds of our relationship.”
 
3. The therapist isn’t viewed as the expert.
 
Rather, the therapist is “the facilitator [who] assist[s] the client in uncovering their own truth and their own process,” Sumber said. “The only room for expertise is the therapists’ ability to reflect the client’s own truth back to them with as little of the therapist’s own baggage as possible,” he added.
 
4. Transpersonal psychology doesn’t judge others’ experiences.
 
Sumber said that transpersonal psychology also is based on the belief that the “client and the therapist both have their own experiences and neither is right, wrong, correct or incorrect, healthy or unhealthy.”
“If a client brings an experience into therapy that makes me uncomfortable, I have the ability to look at my own discomfort and work on it and I can even disclose it to the client if that is appropriate.”
 
5. Various well-known psychologists pioneered transpersonal psychology.
 
According to The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, William James, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow are just a few of the psychologists that played a role in pioneering transpersonal psychology. (Find out more about each psychologist here.)
In fact, William James was the first to use the term “transpersonal” in a 1905 lecture, according to The Textbook of Transpersonal Psychiatry and Psychology, and he’s referred to as the founder of modern transpersonal psychology and psychiatry. As psychologist Eugene Taylor, Ph.D, writes in the book:
He was the first to use the term transpersonal in an English-language context and the first to articulate a scientific study of consciousness within a framework of evolutionary biology. He experimented with psychoactive substances to observe their effects on his own consciousness and was a pioneer in founding the field that is now called parapsychology. He helped to cultivate modern interest in dissociated states, multiple personality, and theories of the subconscious. He explored the field of comparative religion and was probably the first American psychologist to establish relationships with or to influence a number of Asian meditation teachers. He also pioneered in writing about the psychology of mystical experience.
 
6. Transpersonal psychology emerged as a field in the late 1960s.
 
According to the article “Brief History of Transpersonal Psychology” written by one of transpersonal psychology’s founders, psychiatrist Stanislav Grof, in the International Journal of Transpersonal Studies:
In 1967, a small working group including Abraham Maslow, Anthony Sutich, Stanislav Grof, James Fadiman, Miles Vich, and Sonya Margulies met in Menlo Park, California, with the purpose of creating a new psychology that would honour the entire spectrum of human experience, including various non-ordinary states of consciousness. During these discussions, Maslow and Sutich accepted Grof’s suggestion and named the new discipline “transpersonal psychology.” This term replaced their own original name “transhumanistic,” or “reaching beyond humanistic concerns.” Soon after- wards, they launched the Association of Transpersonal Psychology (ATP), and started the Journal of Transpersonal Psychology. Several years later, in 1975, Robert Frager founded the (California) Institute of Transpersonal Psychology in Palo Alto, which has remained at the cutting edge of transpersonal education, research, and therapy for more than three decades. “
 

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity:

Freakscience is a wide sector where we are presenting the researches of the best brains of the Planet to reveal the hidden facts, unknown investigations and unproved theories in many spheres of Normal human science.Today is the time for Sociology.
 
And we give the word to the group of Berkley University sociologist who published recently very interesting report about
THE INFLUENCE OF THE 60’S AND PSYCHEDELIC MUSIC AND CULTURE ON MODERN SOCIETY
 
 
Psychedelic music and the culture of the 1960s and the music of the period had an enormous influence and impact on the way we express ourselves in the modern era. Music has always been both a barometer measuring and responding to society’s problems and possibilities, and the twentieth century was a period that witnessed the emergence of a diverse range of musical styles and genres, each seemingly in reaction to the dominant sociopolitical concerns of the day. Even when the lyrics of songs were not overtly directed towards the description of social conditions and a call to improve them, as was so characteristic of the folk music of the 1960s and 1970s, music was, and always has been, shaped by the conditions of the larger panorama of the socio-cultural moment. The diversity of styles and musical genres that emerged, particularly in the latter half of the century during the turbulent period of the 1960s should hardly come as a surprise, given the variety and intensity of certain social phenomena. There were a number of intense influences that combined to produce this music including increased government control over people’s lives coupled with the fact—perhaps paradoxical—that many people’s lives were getting worse, not better, compelled musicians to respond and integrate matters such as drugs, and they did so in creatively unprecedented ways. This music was thus a response to the dominant concerns of the day and also a reaction that would shape the way people thought and responded to their society. These are only a few reasons why the music of the 1960s is often associated with rebellion and a rebellious period, particularly among the youth population.

The music of the 1960s reflected, as music always does, the zeitgeist of the sociohistorical moment, both articulating and exploring the concerns and interests in larger society. Although critics dismissed the psychedelic music of this period as being too loud, too experimental, and, most worryingly, too tied up with the emerging drugs and the drug culture (Whiteley 33, 62), critic and historian Sheila Whiteley contends that psychedelic music was characterized both by its complexity and its paradoxes (i). While psychedelic music was closely aligned with the drugs and the drug culture—and may, in some ways, be understood as a product of that subculture—it was still, like folk music, a genre of protest, but it was a specific form of protest distinct from the lyrically imperative folk music. As Bindas wrote, “The new psychedelic music registered a protest of form rather than substance. [Psychedelic] music was sexual, highly creative, nonconformist, and clearly in protest of white middle class America” (Bindas 6; emphasis added).

While folk singers like Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, and Peter, Paul, and Mary were strumming their guitars and singing their calls for social justice, systemic change, and freedom for all, typically appealing to love, human reason, and compassionate concern of the listener for his or her fellow human beings both at home and abroad, psychedelic musicians like Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, Pink Floyd, Cream, and Jefferson Airplane were trying to create a similar sense of freedom, but in a totally different way (Whiteley 33). Many of the iconic psychedelic musicians had at least dabbled in drugs and drug culture, if not immersed themselves fully in it, and had, through drugs, achieved a kind of escape, relief, and freedom that did not seem possible in 1960s society, whether here in the United States or in Britain, where psychedelic music also thrived (Bindas 33). There were lots of reasons to escape. For American musicians, in particular, the specter and shame of the Vietnam War hung heavily upon them (Bindas 33). But the “mood song” came to replace the “message song,” as psychedelic musicians sublimated their anxieties and their angst by attempting to just feel better rather than examine how to create systemic change that would make everyone feel better (Bindas 6).

The psychedelic musicians were indisputably affected by the same kinds of concerns that affected their folk music counterparts, but Bindas suggests that musicians and society as a whole had reached its threshold for message music, and wanted to return to the notion of a music that could transport one away from his or her problems rather than situate him or her directly in those problems and require the listener to examine them. Bindas notes several ways in which psychedelic music responded to the sociohistorical moment it occupied. First, he points out, the psychedelic musicians were still infusing their songs with a political flavor—“if anything,” he writes, “[political] fervor had [actually] increased”—but the key distinction of psychedelic music was that “the lyrics were no longer as important, and they could seldom be heard over the music” (Bindas 6). The music itself, meanwhile, was characterized by its instrumental experimentation, distinguished from other forms by “long improvisatory passages and electronically produced sound effects resonated with stroboscopic lighting to bring about a freedom of feeling” (Whiteley 33).

Whether they were entirely conscious of the fact or not, psychedelic musicians and their insistence upon free-flowing, open-ended, electronically distorted “impure” music was a reaction against the increasing “whitewashed conformity of everyday American life” (Fairbanks 14). The Red Scare and Communist witch hunt of the 1950s had left a lingering negative aura over American society, especially for artists and musicians and other producers of cultural creativity. During that period, artists and musicians who had been deemed a threat to the social order were “blacklisted and pushed to the fringes of the mainstream” (Fairbanks 14). Pushed to the periphery, they did not simply cease creative production, however. Instead, they went underground and gave birth to a subculture that would make psychedelic expression in the United States possible.

Psychedelic music, which Johnson and Stax mark as more or less “beginning” in 1967, would ultimately be a reaction against the conformist messages of the media and, above all, the encouragement to adopt supposedly American values (411). It would permit both its musicians and its listeners to enter a parallel universe, one in which control was neither necessary nor welcome. The looping, seemingly undirected music of the psychedelic artists was coupled with lyrics that often focused on insanity, loss of control, and journeys without fixed destinations; in fact, the journeys were trips of the imagination and consciousness, not literal excursions (Johnson & Stax 411). The psychedelic musicians asserted that it was safe to join them in this limitless sphere, and their music thus gained a wide audience, appealing to a segment of the population that had themselves been marginalized and overlooked.

As the music critic Fairbanks thoughtfully observed, “The artists are the critics of culture and the visionaries that open up possibilities for the future” (14), and they are particularly powerful when they come from the underground as was the case with many of the musicians of the 1960s. By reacting to the events of their day and unique historical conditions using musical and lyrical strategies that were non-conformist, the psychedelic artists opened up new musical possibilities, particularly with respect to the traditionally expected and accepted form and function of songs. Their music was shaped by their sociohistorical moment, but it also, ultimately, would shape that moment, too.

Works Cited

Bindas, Kenneth J. America’s Musical Pulse: Popular Music in Twentieth Century Society. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Fairbanks, Philip. “Gonzo Lives Underground.” Afterimage 31.4 (2004): 14.

Johnson, Ann, and Mike Stax. “From Psychotic to Psychedelic: The Garage Contribution to Psychedelia.” Popular Music and Society 29.4 (2006): 411.

Whiteley, Sheila. The Space Between the Notes: Rock and the Counter-Culture. New York: Routledge, 1992.

 

Thursday, 06 March 2014 12:41

Page 4: Freakscience - Cosmogenesis

Do you really think that monkeys are our relatives? Go to eat bananas then. You think Goa created us? For sure… But who is Him? Are you sure he is not a very powerful Dude from outer Space who just playing us as a toys on his playground in a size of a Universe? Lets see what Theosophy says about our origin:
 
COSMOGENESIS IN THEOSOPHY.
 
The word Cosmogenesis refers to how the cosmos was created or came into existence. In this sense it must also imply the eventual creation of all things, including ourselves.
 
Modern science has postulated its theory of ‘the big bang’. This theory says that before the Cosmos was created, the basic matter of the Cosmos was compressed into a single point or ‘singularity’. The pressure at this point must have been enormous – something like a star when it collapses in on itself before exploding into what we call a ‘Super Nova’ – but the pressure of this cosmic singularity would have been many times greater. Just like a super nova, the pressure became too great with the result that there was an incredible explosion – ‘the big bang’. All this is based on the fact that the stars, galaxies, and the rest of the material in the universe appears to be spreading outward, moving away from some distant centre. From this point of view the theory holds good, and would also seem to be supported by other corroborating evidence. But the Ancient Wisdom says much more.
 
To begin with, the big bang refers only to the material plane, to the physical matter of the Cosmos. It says nothing about the inner planes such as the psychic or spiritual planes. The Ancient Wisdom says that physical matter is the outward effect of several finer states of existence from the purely spiritual, at the highest level of being, to the crude energy structure underlying physical particles.
 
The ancient wisdom does not teach of a God or Creator in personal terms, it teaches of a creative process or principles giving rise to laws – the laws of creation or of nature. It does speak of ‘beings’ who ‘unfold’ from within this potential as it begins its process of creation. These beings are the expressions of divine consciousness at the highest possible level of existence, unfolding at the early stages of the creative process. These beings are aligned in what we call hierarchies. There are many names for these because each of the many religions throughout the ages has sought to name them according to their own understanding. The Kabalah names them as Elohim, the Christians as the Seven Spirits Before the Throne and Archangels. In the Greek myths they were the Gods of Olympus, and so on, the list is a long one. The Wisdom Teaching numbers this hierarchy and gives their purpose or expression in the creative process, from the highest architect of the Cosmos right down through the Dhyan Chohans and Devas to the simple Elementals that assist in the workings of Mother Nature.
Before the creation process begins there is ‘no thing’ but there is a ‘potential’. The ancient wisdom teaching tells us that this ‘potential’ is potential consciousness and potential matter - the eternal Father/Mother in a state of non-being. ‘Wrapped in invisible robes in each other’s embrace slumbering for seven eternities.’ This state is called ‘pralaya’, meaning resting or withdrawn from activity.
We are told that creation is cyclic in two distinct phases– conscious and unconscious, activity and rest, being and non-being, manifest and un-manifest, or actual and potential. We can find many comparisons in our own experience and knowledge, such as the fact that as human beings we have the potential to create in many forms, music, art, literature etc. This potential is in us, yet in itself is no-thing until we act to bring it into being.
The ancient teaching tells us that the first thing that happens is a ‘waking up’ or a welling up of the creative purpose into the virgin matter of space. The Vedic scriptures are written in the old language of Sanskrit. In Sanskrit the terms used are Parabrahman (unmanifest consciousness, spirit, fire) and Mulaprakriti (mula = root, prakriti = nature – root-nature or root-matter. These two are opposite poles of the divine or Absolute in its state of rest between creations. It is as though the spirit sleeps wrapped in its veil of virgin matter, brooding through the indeterminable aeons of rest or pralaya. When it wakes up it does so within the virgin space and in so doing impregnates her with its seed (will).
Virgin space – (This ‘space’ is the ‘Darkness’ of Genesis, that which ‘was on the face of the deep’) is described as matter with its three conditions in absolute balance. These are inertia, motion, and rhythm. When spirit wakes up in it this balance is broken and ceaseless activity is the result.
Spirit also expresses three aspects – singular, dual, and triple - or Will, Capacity, and Activity. Once these three aspects unfold the term used is the Logos (the triple Logos – the Holy Trinity).
 
Please refer to diagram.

 

 
The first outpouring is by the third aspect of the Logos; this is represented by the centre line, and labelled in red as the first outpouring. The nature of this aspect is activity. In Tibetan occult science it is called Fohat. It has different names in various scriptures and traditions but all of them signify the same quality – fire. It is an expansive force. More accurately, Fohat is the fire or light aspect of divine consciousness. Fohat manifests at all levels, Akasha, Astral Light, Chi, Electricity, Kundalini, and so on. However, it is what Fohat does that is the most interesting.
To begin, Fohat, or the third Logos, ‘digs’ holes in the raw substance of space, and these holes are like bubbles containing the fire of Fohat as it wells up within it. The whole of the space that has been circumscribed for the new creation is soon filled with them. Next, Fohat works in a spiral motion, drawing these bubbles into strings, which it links in the form of a double helix. This is remarkably like the form of the DNA molecule. In this way the first plane of matter is formed, called the logic plane due to it being the plane of manifestation of the Logos.
There is a limit to the arrangement of these rarefied aggregations of logic matter – seven types and seven sub-types of each. When that limit is reached Fohat takes these basic whorls and combines them into denser combinations, spinning them in such a way that they interlock to form heavier material. This is the matter of the next plane – the Monadic. By repeating this process of combining and re-combining Fohat produces ever more dense and heavier matter and thereby planes, until all seven planes are organised from the logic down to the physical.
Now it is the turn of the second aspect of the triple Logos to go to work. This is the form builder – capacity or the dual aspect. It is the father and mother in nature, the inherent life-within-matter emerging from the newly established material of the planes. It is duality in its role of action and re-action, cause and effect.
In motions that are cycles within cycles, the second Logos builds forms from the basic matter of each plane in turn, ensouling them as it proceeds. The second Logos is often referred to as soul in its primal state. Each form that it builds is a vehicle for the expression of the divine purpose, and each new form is better and more complex than the last, so that the purpose or will of the creative process can be more fully realised.
As the second Logos outpours through the planes towards the farthest from the source – the physical – it is said to be following the course of ‘involution’. After it reaches the physical plane it begins to return through the planes back towards its divine source and is said to be following the ‘path of return’ or evolution.
Using diagram one, you can see the ‘path of return’ outlined on the right hand side, first establishing the mineral kingdom, then the vegetable kingdom, the animal kingdom, and finally the human kingdom. It is at the point of transition from the animal to the human kingdoms that the third outpouring takes place. This is the action of the first Logos – the ‘will’ – the originating purpose of the creator.
Flashing down through the matter of the planes to meet the returning life wave at the higher mental level it illumines man’s mind giving self-conscious awareness. All three aspects of the triple Logos now follow the path of return through the Buddhic, Atmic, and Monadic levels of awareness. The third Logos – the fire aspect – returns as the Kundalini force working through the etheric spinal channels and the chakras.
This is only a brief and very shallow look at the creative process. It is a basic outline for the purpose of gaining a simple understanding of the overall view. The ancient wisdom gives incredible details of all stages of the creation of the Cosmos, and such a detailed study must be considered esoteric science. The details available to the serious student are such that one is left in no doubt whatsoever that the ancient wisdom is by far the most accurate and true explanation of the nature of life and the Cosmos. The Masters of the Wisdom have safeguarded this knowledge for the benefit of all of humanity, knowing as they do that it is authentic in every respect.

If you think, there is no relation between Literature and Science- you forget about History.
Today we decided to publish proper research –that was submitted by Robert John Dickins, to the University of Exeter as a thesis for the degree of Master of Philosophy in English, September, 2012.
The Birth of Psychedelic Literature: Drug Writing and the rise of LSD Therapy 1954 – 1964:
This thesis examines hallucinogen drug literature published between 1954-1964 in Britain and North America. By arguing that these texts are medically and culturally contingent to psychiatric research that was being undertaken with various hallucinogens during the period, including Lysergic acid diethylamide and mescaline, via the development of three psychiatric models—the psycholytic, psychotomimetic and psychedelic—it seeks to establish the relationship between psychiatric practice and the form and content of the texts.
Furthermore, it examines an inter-textual dialogue concerning the medical, spiritual and philosophical value of these drugs, which has a direct effect on the development of the a forementioned psychiatric research models. In doing so, this thesis also traces the historical popularization of these drugs as they left the clinical setting and entered in to wider society, as propagated by the literature. Broadly speaking, through these analyses, it establishes the primary texts as representing a minor literary movement—Psychedelic literature—through the emergence of a psycho spiritual narrative.
 
INTRODUCTION:
Between 1954 - 1964 a number of books were published that described psychoactive drug experiences with hallucinogens under the auspices of, or directly influenced by, psychiatry: The Doors of Perception (1954), Heaven and Hell (1956) and Island (1962) by Aldous Huxley; A Drug Taker’s Notes (1957) by Richard Heron Ward; Exploring Inner Space (1961) by Jane Dunlap; Myself and I (1962) by Constance A. Newland; The Joyous Cosmology (1962) by Alan Watts; The Discovery of Love (1963) by Malden Grange Bishop; and The Psychedelic Experience (1964) by Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert. Collectively, these texts will be referred to as psychedelic literature and their psychiatrically-mediated dialogue, this thesis argues, reveals them to be a minor medico-cultural and literary movement.

By contextualising the primary texts according to the development of three psychiatric research/therapy models—the psycholytic, psychotomimetic and psychedelic—this thesis will demonstrate a dynamic, interpenetrative relationship between the books and the theoretical and methodological approaches of these psychiatric and psychoanalytic practices, while also elucidating a dialogue that occurred between the books themselves. Firstly, this will ground the texts within a socio-historical context that is used to identify the texts as a body of work—psychedelic literature—and secondly, the thesis will examine how the literature helped transform the practises themselves; thus demonstrating a cultural-contingency between the practice of hallucinogen research and drug literature from the same period. Broadly speaking then, this thesis is a medico-cultural and literary history of hallucinogen research, occurring in both Britain and North America, which aims at grounding the primary texts within the same cultural paradigm, arguing for the existence of a minor literary movement; psychedelic literature.

The primary texts will now be briefly introduced in regard to the proliferation of hallucinogen research during the 1950s and early 1960s; this in order to socially and historically contextualise them. It is then necessary, in 1.4, to position the argument of this thesis within the wider critical tradition of drug literature. This will be achieved by recounting the history of drug writing as a critical discipline, along with the various methodological approaches that have been employed, and will also elucidate the context in which the primary texts of this thesis have hitherto been understood......
 
To read more, Download attachments: DickinsR.pdf
Friday, 21 February 2014 08:09

Page 4: Freakscience - Vijayanagara Empire

History is a very important part of any, even freakscience. The difference between normal and ours is obvious. Freaks are lazy. So instead of spending our time to film a  movie, put the subtitles, edit it we simply upload a video lectorium for Indian primary school.
Check it out, know more, expand your consciousness!

 

Saturday, 15 February 2014 05:36

Page 4: Freakscience - Psychedelic visuals tech

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity: 
 
 
If you ever visited the parties organised by Goa-Freaks.Com, you might realise that for the last years we have put a lot of attention to the visionary sector. Now Daydreamer Creative Lab, using the latest video mapping and VJing thechnologies have reached a top level of production of psychedelic projections and today the specialists from the Lab would like to reveal some secrets and tricks in video mapping and Psychedelic visuals tech and try to give you an idea about
 
VJing as itself.

VJing is a broad designation for real time visual performance. Characteristics of VJing are the creation or manipulation of imagery in real time through technological mediation and for an audience, in synchronization to music. VJing often takes place at events such as psychedelic trance parties, nightclubs, music festivals and sometimes in combination with other performative arts. This results in a live multimedia performance that can include music, actors and dancers. The term VJing became popular in its association with MTV's Video Jockey but its origins date back to the New York club scene of the 70s. In both situations VJing is the manipulation or selection of visuals, the same way DJing is a selection and manipulation of audio.

One of the key elements in the practice of VJing is the real time mix of content from a "library of media", on storage media image files on computer hard drives, live camera input, or from a computer generated visuals. In addition to the selection of media, VJing mostly implies real time processing of the visual material.
Technological developments
The availability and affordability of new consumer-level technology allowed many more people to get involved into VJing. The dramatic increase in computer processing power that became available facilitated more compact, yet often more complex setups, sometimes allowing VJs to bypass using a video mixer, using powerful computers running VJ software to control their mixing instead. However, many VJs continue to use video mixers with multiple sources, which allows flexibility for a wide range of input devices and a level of security against computer crashes or slowdowns in video playback due to overloading the CPU of computers due to the demanding nature of realtime video processing.
Today's VJs have a wide choice of off the shelf hardware products, covering every aspect of visuals performance, including video sample playback (Korg Kaptivator), real-time video effects (Korg Entrancer) and 3D visual generation (Edirol CG8).
The widespread use of DVDs gave initiative for scratchable DVD players (Pioneer DVJ-X1 andPioneer DVJ-1000).
Many new models of MIDI controllers became available during the 2000s, which allow VJs to use controllers based on physical knobs, dials, and sliders, rather than interact primarily with the mouse/keyboard computer interface.

There are also many VJs working with experimental approaches to working with live video. Open source graphical programming environments (such as Pure Data) are often used to create custom software interfaces for performances, or to connect experimental devices to their computer for processing live data (for example, the IBVA EEG-reading brainwave unit, the Arduino microprocessor, orcircuit bending children's toys).

The second half of this decade also saw a dramatic increase in display configurations being deployed, including widescreen canvases, multiple projections and video mapped onto the architectural form. This shift has been underlined by the transition from broadcast based technology - fixed until this decade firmly in the 4x3 aspect ratio specifications NTSCand PAL - to computer industry technology, where the varied needs of office presentation, immersive gaming and corporate video presentation have led to diversity and abundance in methods of output. Compared to the ~640x480i fixed format of NTSC/PAL, a contemporary laptop using DVI can output a great variety of resolutions up to ~2500px wide, and in conjunction with the Matrox TripleHead2Go can feed three different displays with an image coordinated across them all.
 
VJ hardware can be split into categories -
• Source hardware generates a video picture which can be manipulated by the VJ, e.g. video cameras and Video Synthesizers.
• Playback hardware plays back an existing video stream from disk or tape based storage mediums, e.g. VHS tape players and DVD players.
• Mixing hardware allows the combining of multiple streams of video e.g. a Video Mixer or a computer utilizing VJ software.
• Effects hardware allows the adding of special effects to the video stream, e.g. Colour Correction units

• Output hardware is for displaying the video signal, e.g. Video projector, LED display, or Plasma Screen.

There are many types of software a VJ may use in their work, traditional NLE production tools such as Adobe Premiere, After Effects, and Apple's Final Cut Pro are used to create content for VJ shows. Specialist performance software is used by VJs to play back and manipulate video in real time. Cinema 4D. Quartz composer.
VJ performance software is highly diverse, many applications are developed by VJs themselves specifically to suit their own performance style. Graphical programming environments such as Max/MSP/Jitter, Isadora and Pure Data have developed to facilitate rapid development of such custom software without needing years of coding experience.

12 Logiciels VJing et Vidéo Mapping

24 logiciels VJ's pour Mac

3L http://thrill.artificialeyes.tv/
CoGe http://coge.lovqc.hu/
Flowmotion http://www.robotfunk.com/
Gephex http://www.gephex.org/
glitchNES http://www.no-carrier.com/glitchnes.html
GRAND VJ http://www.arkaos.net/
Livid Cell http://www.lividinstruments.com/software_cell.php
Mabuse http://mabuse.co.uk/
Modul8 http://www.garagecube.com/modul8/index.php
Motion Dive Tokyo http://www.digitalstage.jp/mdt/index.php
Moldeo http://www.moldeo.org/
MXWendler http://www.mxwendler.net/
Onyx-VJ http://www.onyx-vj.com/
Processing http://www.processing.org/
Puredata http://puredata.info/
Quase-Cinema http://www.quasecinema.org/
Resolume Avenue http://www.resolume.com/avenue/
Salvation http://www.harrisondigitalmedia.com/
SoYuZ http://www.vjsputnik.com/
VJ4live http://www.vj4live.com/
Videator http://www.stone.com/Videator/
VIP 5.0 http://www.artificialeyes.tv/vip
VDMX http://www.vidvox.net/
VJ Mode http://www.soniconlab.com/

 
PS. Some of live recorded video of VJ Daydreamer from some passed events and all info about him you can find at CLICK here
 
Two years ago Goa-Freaks.Com have created a new concept of night entertainment. The combined work of the production team, decorators group, DJ and VJs- Conceptual Psychedelic Multimedia Performance. That is the demo video of the Time Odysseey show, filmed on February, 25, 2013
in Panorama Olympia, Goa.
 

 
 
 
Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity: 
Uniting Science and Spirituality
 
 
Energy-Matter
Perhaps the most important discovery ever to made in the world of physics was Einstein's theory of relativity and his famous equation E = mc2. The equation reveals that 1 kilogram of matter corresponds to 25,000,000,000 kWh of energy, which could power a town for 3 years or a car for 100,000 years. The equation shows that energy and matter are different manifestations of the same thing. It shows that there is only one substance "energy-matter", which has a dual nature and can manifest as energy or matter. The same can be said about light, which can either display the behaviour of a wave or the behaviour of a particle. This does not mean that light changes back and forth between waves and particles at will, but that it is in some intermediate state which can express both aspects simultaneously. It is possible that sub-atomic particles of matter are actually standing waves of energy. Low frequency waves vibrate slowly and behave like matter, and high frequency waves vibrate rapidly and behave like energy. This clearly has some similarities with "string theory" where everything is believed to be composed of incredibly minute (10-33 centimetres long, or about a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a centimetre) strings or loops of energy-matter vibrating in ten dimensions. Our brains can only comprehend four dimensions – the three spatial dimensions (length, width and height) and one temporal dimension (time). So there may be six hidden spatial dimensions. The cosmologies of eastern religions are based around seven planes of existence with our physical plane being the lowest. Of the six higher planes, some are said to be composed of subtle matter and some of pure energy. So it seems that modern physics is beginning to discover what has been known in the East for millennia.
 
Higher Dimensions
As we have just discussed, some of the current theories of fundamental physics state that there are hidden spatial dimensions beyond the three that we live in. It is impossible to even imagine what a higher dimension would be like, but to get some idea think of Dr Who's TARDIS, which was bigger on the inside than it was on the outside. Or you could imagine a house with a special room that is much bigger than the whole house – the room is so big in fact, it is the size of a mansion. Then imagine that this mansion also has special rooms which are the size of even bigger mansions, and so on. I believe this is what Christ was referring to when he said, "In my father's house are many mansions" (John 14:2). We know that God lives in heaven, so Christ is saying that the heavens are multi-dimensional and that each higher realm is more expansive than the last. Think about it – could you come up with a simpler description to explain a multi-dimensional universe in a non-scientific manner to the people of 2000 years ago?
 
Missing Matter
Studies on the rotation of stars around galaxies have shown that 96% of the universe is unaccounted for. In theory, stars on the outer rim of a galaxy should not be able to rotate as fast as those near the centre, because the increased centrifugal force would cause them to fly off into outer space. However, it has been found that stars on the rim of a galaxy do rotate just as fast as those in the centre, which contradicts the laws of physics! So scientists had to come up with a new theory that would take this into account. The mass of all the visible matter within a galaxy only provides 4% of the gravitational field that is required to stop it from literally ripping itself apart. So why aren't all the galaxies flying apart? In the mid 1970s physicists and astronomers started looking for the missing matter of the universe. They called it "dark matter" because it is not visible. More recently the discovery of vast spherical energy auras, which totally encircle the galactic disc, indicates the presence of a large mass of dark matter and dark energy outside the galactic nucleus. Dark energy is a hypothetical form of energy which permeates all of space and has strong negative pressure, which explains the accelerating expansion of the universe. It is a relatively new concept that forms part of the "Standard Model", which states that the universe is composed of approximately 4% visible matter, 23% dark matter and 73% dark energy. This dark matter and energy is the energy-matter of the aforementioned higher planes of Hindu and Buddhist cosmologies and the hidden spatial dimensions of string theory.
 
Quantum Foam
Quantum foam, also known as space-time foam, is a concept in quantum physics proposed by Nobel physicist John Wheeler in 1955 to describe the microscopic sea of bubbling energy-matter. The foam is what space-time would look like if we could zoom in to a scale of 10-33 centimetres (the Planck length). At this microscopic scale particles of matter appear to be nothing more than standing waves of energy. Wheeler proposed that minute wormholes measuring 10-33 centimetres could exist in the quantum foam, which some physicists theorise could even be hyper-spatial links to other dimensions. The hyper-spatial nature of the quantum foam could account for principles like the transmission of light and the flow of time. Various scientists believe that quantum foam is an incredibly powerful source of zero-point energy, and it has been estimated that one cubic centimetre of empty space contains enough energy to boil all the world's oceans. If we could describe a microscopic standing wave pattern that appeared particle-like and incorporated a vortex within its structure, we might have a theory that could unite all the current variants in modern physics. Figure 2a appears to meet these criteria. It is a drawing of a subatomic particle reproduced from Occult Chemistry by Charles Leadbeater and Annie Besant which was first published in 1909, although a similar diagram was published in a theosophical journal in 1895. Leadbeater and Besant explain that each subatomic particle is composed of ten loops which circulate energy from higher dimensions. Back in 1895, they knew that physical matter was composed from "strings" – 10 years before Einstein's theory of relativity and 80 years before string theory. The structure of energy-matter may have been known for over 100 years, yet completely ignored by conventional science.
 
 
We Are All One
The universe is believed to have sprung into existence from a singularity (a single point). The singularity expanded to become the universe, so everything still remains a part of that singularity. With this interpretation the paradoxes of non-locality and faster-than-light communication become meaningless because everything is connected and everything is one – a concept that is by no means new to spirituality.
 
The Big Bang and Cosmic Inflation
Cosmic inflation theory states that the universe is not expanding into space; rather space itself is expanding, dragging stars and galaxies in its wake. A simple analogy is that of a balloon, representing space-time, with some dots drawn on it to represent the galaxies. When the balloon is inflated the dots move further apart. So the big bang wasn't matter exploding to fill empty space – it was matter, energy and space expanding together into an endless void of nothingness. But where did all the matter come from? The theory of relativity states that matter can neither be created nor destroyed, so if it wasn't created it must have been transformed into matter from energy. But where did the energy come from? It must have always been there and was just reawakened or recycled in the big bang. Ancient eastern religious texts state that the universe goes through cycles of "in-breaths" and "out-breaths". Generally with an explosion there is an initial rapid expansion followed by a gradual slowing down. Not so with the universe – its expansion is accelerating, 14 billion years after the Big Bang! The reason for the acceleration seems to be an increase in the quantity of dark energy, which produces a vacuum effect resulting in evermore rapid expansion. This subsequent influx of energy from a higher source is clearly not what we would expect from a typical explosion. So the Big Bang appears to be under some sort of external control – perhaps the mind of God? If we stay with the assumption that dark energy exists in higher dimensions, it seems that there has been a rush of energy descending into the physical dimension (the out-breath) and that at some point in the future it will return to the higher dimensions and the physical universe will contract or dissolve (the in-breath).
 
Beyond the Universe
What existed before the universe began, and what, if anything, will exist after the universe ends? Scientists believe that our universe exists within a metaverse (meta-universe). The metaverse is timeless and eternal because it is an absolute void and totally unmanifest. Kabbalah has a term that exactly corresponds to the metaverse: "Ain" is the infinite nothingness; the void; non-existence; the eternal empty background; the zero. The universe is widely believed by scientists to have originated from a singularity, a single point that contains the infinite potential of the universe. Once again Kabbalah has an equivalent term: "Ain Soph" is the limitless (potential); the absolute source of creation; the one. The Hindu term "Brahman" has the same meaning: God unmanifest; the transcendent reality that is the source of all being in this universe; the singularity from which "all that is" originated, including space and time. Our universe has been compared to foam floating on a sea of zero-point energy – an energy so enormous that many physicists ignore it and leave it out of their equations. Zero-point energy is believed to exist at every point in the universe, even in empty space, yet is currently undetectable because it seems to lie just beyond our reality. No prizes for guessing that Kabbalah also has a term to describe it: "Ain Soph Aur" is the infinite light; the infinite energy that manifests our universe. The ancient terms directly correspond to those used in modern physics, so once again science is catching up with ancient spiritual knowledge.
 
Gravity and Magnetism
Some physicists have suggested that the force of gravity is much weaker than the other forces because it leaks out into hidden dimensions, so that we only feel part of its effect. I suspect the reverse may be true and that gravity originates in a higher dimension and leaks down into our reality, because if it originated here "gravitons" (theoretical particles) would be real and detectable rather than just hypothetical. Science finds it impossible to explain non-physical phenomena such as magnetic fields in physical terms. Magnetic fields are clearly not based upon physical particles because, like gravity, they exert a force even in a vacuum (where no physical particles are present), so scientists have to come up with imaginary particles like "virtual photons" to explain the phenomenon. As with gravity, I believe that magnetic forces originate in higher dimensions and only their effects can be felt in our physical dimension. Extra dimensions are the only logical way to explain all non-physical phenomena.
 
Black Hole Universe
Physicist Paul Wesson and his team at the University of Waterloo in Canada have calculated that our entire universe could be the inside of a higher-dimensional black hole. The theory provides a better description of the beginning of the universe than the big bang because it accounts for the creation of matter. In Wesson's model, energy from the higher-dimensional universe streams down from the higher universe and condenses to form the matter of our universe. This is consistent with the esoteric system of creation which is fully described in Chapter 5. Wesson's model also predicts that a collapsing universe would bounce back just before it became a singularity, and begin expanding again. This is consistent with the Hindu belief that the universe goes through cycles of "in-breaths" and "out-breaths". Wesson is now considering the idea of "Russian doll universes", with each world embedded in another higher dimensional world, which is exactly how esoterics describe the universe

 

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity: 
The nature of Audio-Hallucinations.
 

Hearing Things

In 1973 the journal Science published an article that caused an immediate furor. It was entitled "On Being Sane in Insane Places," and it described how, as an experiment, eight "pseudopatients" with no history of mental illness presented themselves at a variety of hospitals across the United States. Their single complaint was that they "heard voices." They told hospital staff that they could not really make out what the voices said but that they heard the words "empty," "hollow," and "thud." Apart from this fabrication, they behaved normally and recounted their own (normal) past experiences and medical histories. Nonetheless, all of them were diagnosed as schizophrenic (except one, who was diagnosed with "manic-depressive psychosis"), hospitalized for up to two months, and prescribed antipsychotic medications (which they did not swallow). Once admitted to the mental wards, they continued to speak and behave normally; they reported to the medical staff that their hallucinated voices had disappeared and that they felt fine. They even kept notes on their experiment, quite openly (this was registered in the nursing notes for one pseudopatient as "writing behavior"), but none of the pseudopatients were identified as such by the staff. This experiment, designed by David Rosenhan, a Stanford psychologist (and himself a pseudopatient), emphasized, among other things, that the single symptom of "hearing voices" could suffice for an immediate, categorical diagnosis of schizophrenia even in the absence of any other symptoms or abnormalities of behavior. Psychiatry, and society in general, had been subverted by the almost axiomatic belief that "hearing voices" spelled madness and never occurred except in the context of severe mental disturbance.

This belief is a fairly recent one, as the careful and humane reservations of early researchers on schizophrenia made clear. But by the 1970s, antipsychotic drugs and tranquilizers had begun to replace other treatments, and careful history taking, looking at the whole life of the patient, had largely been replaced by the use of DSM criteria to make snap diagnoses.

Eugen Bleuler, who directed the huge Burghˆlzli asylum near Zurich from 1898 to 1927, paid close and sympathetic attention to the many hundreds of schizophrenic people under his care. He recognized that the "voices" his patients heard, however outlandish they might seem, were closely associated with their mental states and delusions. The voices, he wrote, embodied "all their strivings and fears ... their entire transformed relationship to the external world ... above all ... [to] the pathological or hostile powers" that beset them. He described these in vivid detail in his great 1911 monograph, Dementia Praecox; or, The Group of Schizophrenias:

The voices not only speak to the patient, but they pass electricity through the body, beat him, paralyse him, take his thoughts away. They are often hypostasized as people, or in other very bizarre ways. For example, a patient claims that a "voice" is perched above each of his ears. One voice is a little larger than the other but both are about the size of a walnut, and they consist of nothing but a large ugly mouth.

Threats or curses form the main and most common content of the "voices." Day and night they come from everywhere, from the walls, from above and below, from the cellar and the roof, from heaven and from hell, from near and far ... When the patient is eating, he hears a voice saying, "Each mouthful is stolen." If he drops something, he hears, "If only your foot had been chopped off."

The voices are often very contradictory. At one time they may be against the patient ... then they may contradict themselves ... The roles of pro and con are often taken over by voices of different people ... The voice of a daughter tells a patient: "He is going to be burned alive," while his mother's voice says, "He will not be burned." Besides their persecutors the patients often hear the voice of some protector.

The voices are often localized in the body ... A polyp may be the occasion for localizing the voices in the nose. An intestinal disturbance brings them into connection with the abdomen ... In cases of sexual complexes, the penis, the urine in the bladder, or the nose utter obscene words ... A really or imaginarily gravid patient will hear her child or children speaking inside her womb ...

Inanimate objects may speak. The lemonade speaks, the patient's name is heard to be coming from a glass of milk. The furniture speaks to him.

Bleuler wrote, "Almost every schizophrenic who is hospitalized hears 'voices.'" But he emphasized that the reverse did not hold ó that hearing voices did not necessarily denote schizophrenia. In the popular imagination, though, hallucinatory voices are almost synonymous with schizophrenia ó a great misconception, for most people who do hear voices are not schizophrenic.

Many people report hearing voices which are not particularly directed at them, as Nancy C. wrote:

I hallucinate conversations on a regular basis, often as I am falling asleep at night. It seems to me that these conversations are real and are actually taking place between real people, at the very time I'm hearing them, but are occurring somewhere else. I hear couples arguing, all kinds of things. They are not voices I can identify, they are not people I know. I feel like I'm a radio, tuned into someone else's world. (Though always an American-English-speaking world.) I can't think of any way to regard these experiences except as hallucinations. I am never a participant; I am never addressed. I am just listening in.

"Hallucinations in the sane" were well recognized in the nineteenth century, and with the rise of neurology, people sought to understand more clearly what caused them. In England in the 1880s, the Society for Psychical Research was founded to collect and investigate reports of apparitions or hallucinations, especially those of the bereaved, and many eminent scientists ó physicists as well as physiologists and psychologists ó joined the society (William James was active in the American branch). Telepathy, clairvoyance, communication with the dead, and the nature of a spirit world became the subjects of systematic investigation.

These early researchers found that hallucinations were not uncommon in the general population. Their 1894 "International Census of Waking Hallucinations in the Sane" examined the occurrence and nature of hallucinations experienced by normal people in normal circumstances (they took care to exclude anyone with obvious medical or psychiatric problems). Seventeen thousand people were sent a single question:

Have you ever, when believing yourself to be completely awake, had a vivid impression of seeing or being touched by a living being or inanimate object, or of hearing a voice, which impression, as far as you could discover, was not due to an external physical cause?

More than 10 percent responded in the affirmative, and of those, more than a third heard voices. As John Watkins noted in his book Hearing Voices, hallucinated voices "having some kind of religious or supernatural content represented a small but significant minority of these reports." Most of the hallucinations, however, were of a more quotidian character.

Perhaps the commonest auditory hallucination is hearing one's own name spoken ó either by a familiar voice or an anonymous one. Freud, writing in The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, remarked on this:

During the days when I was living alone in a foreign city ó I was a young man at the time ó I quite often heard my name suddenly called by an unmistakable and beloved voice; I then noted down the exact moment of the hallucination and made anxious enquiries of those at home about what had happened at that time. Nothing had happened.

The voices that are sometimes heard by people with schizophrenia tend to be accusing, threatening, jeering, or persecuting. By contrast, the voices hallucinated by the "normal" are often quite unremarkable, as Daniel Smith brings out in his book Muses, Madmen, and Prophets: Hearing Voices and the Borders of Sanity. Smith's own father and grandfather heard such voices, and they had very different reactions. His father started hearing voices at the age of thirteen, Smith writes:

These voices weren't elaborate, and they weren't disturbing in content. They issued simple commands. They instructed him, for instance, to move a glass from one side of the table to another or to use a particular subway turnstile. Yet in listening to them and obeying them his interior life became, by all reports, unendurable.

Smith's grandfather, by contrast, was nonchalant, even playful, in regard to his hallucinatory voices. He described how he tried to use them in betting at the racetrack. ("It didn't work, my mind was clouded with voices telling me that this horse could win or maybe this one is ready to win.") It was much more successful when he played cards with his friends. Neither the grandfather or the father had strong supernatural inclinations; nor did they have any significant mental illness. They just heard unremarkable voices concerned with everyday things ó as do millions of others.

Smith's father and grandfather rarely spoke of their voices. They listened to them in secrecy and silence, perhaps feeling that admitting to hearing voices would be seen as an indication of madness or at least serious psychiatric turmoil. Yet many recent studies confirm that it is not that uncommon to hear voices and that the majority of those who do are not schizophrenic; they are more like Smith's father and grandfather.

It is clear that attitudes to hearing voices are critically important. One can be tortured by voices, as Daniel Smith's father was, or accepting and easygoing, like his grandfather. Behind these personal attitudes are the attitudes of society, attitudes which have differed profoundly in different times and places.

Hearing voices occurs in every culture and has often been accorded great importance ó the gods of Greek myth often spoke to mortals, and the gods of the great monotheistic traditions, too. Voices have been significant in this regard, perhaps more so than visions, for voices, language, can convey an explicit message or command as images alone cannot.

Until the eighteenth century, voices ó like visions ó were ascribed to supernatural agencies: gods or demons, angels or djinns. No doubt there was sometimes an overlap between such voices and those of psychosis or hysteria, but for the most part, voices were not regarded as pathological; if they stayed inconspicuous and private, they were simply accepted as part of human nature, part of the way it was with some people.

Around the middle of the eighteenth century, a new secular philosophy started to gain ground with the philosophers and scientists of the Enlightenment, and hallucinatory visions and voices came to be seen as having a physiological basis in the overactivity of certain centers in the brain.

But the romantic idea of "inspiration" still held, too ó the artist, especially the writer, was seen or saw himself as the transcriber, the amanuensis, of a Voice, and sometimes had to wait years (as Rilke did) for the Voice to speak.

Talking to oneself is basic to human beings, for we are a linguistic species; the great Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky thought that "inner speech" was a prerequisite of all voluntary activity. I talk to myself, as many of us do, for much of the day ó admonishing myself ("You fool! Where did you leave your glasses?"), encouraging myself ("You can do it!"), complaining ("Why is that car in my lane?"), and, more rarely, congratulating myself ("It's done!"). Those voices are not externalized; I would never mistake them for the voice of God, or anyone else.

But when I was in great danger once, trying to descend a mountain with a badly injured leg, I heard an inner voice that was wholly unlike my normal babble of inner speech. I had a great struggle crossing a stream with a buckled and dislocating knee. The effort left me stunned, motionless for a couple of minutes, and then a delicious languor came over me, and I thought to myself, Why not rest here? A nap maybe? This was immediately countered by a strong, clear, commanding voice, which said, "You can't rest here ó you can't rest anywhere. You've got to go on. Find a pace you can keep up and go on steadily." This good voice, this Life voice, braced and resolved me. I stopped trembling and did not falter again.

Joe Simpson, climbing in the Andes, also had a catastrophic accident, falling off an ice ledge and ending up in a deep crevasse with a broken leg. He struggled to survive, as he recounted inTouching the Void ó and a voice was crucial in encouraging and directing him:

There was silence, and snow, and a clear sky empty of life, and me, sitting there, taking it all in, accepting what I must try to achieve. There were no dark forces acting against me. A voice in my head told me that this was true, cutting through the jumble in my mind with its coldly rational sound.

It was as if there were two minds within me arguing the toss. The voice was clean and sharp and commanding. It was always right, and I listened to it when it spoke and acted on its decisions. The other mind rambled out a disconnected series of images, and memories and hopes, which I attended to in a daydream state as I set about obeying the orders of the voice. I had to get to the glacier ... The voice told me exactly how to go about it, and I obeyed while my other mind jumped abstractly from one idea to another ... The voice, and the watch, urged me into motion whenever the heat from the glacier halted me in a drowsy exhausted daze. It was three o'clock ó only three and a half hours of daylight left. I kept moving but soon realized that I was making ponderously slow headway. It didn't seem to concern me that I was moving like a snail. So long as I obeyed the voice, then I would be all right.

Such voices may occur with anyone in situations of extreme threat or danger. Freud heard voices on two such occasions, as he mentioned in his book On Aphasia:

I remember having twice been in danger of my life, and each time the awareness of the danger occurred to me quite suddenly. On both occasions I felt "this was the end," and while otherwise my inner language proceeded with only indistinct sound images and slight lip movements, in these situations of danger I heard the words as if somebody was shouting them into my ear, and at the same time I saw them as if they were printed on a piece of paper floating in the air.

The threat to life may also come from within, and although we cannot know how many attempts at suicide have been prevented by a voice, I suspect this is not uncommon. My friend Liz, following the collapse of a love affair, found herself heartbroken and despondent. About to swallow a handful of sleeping tablets and wash them down with a tumbler of whiskey, she was startled to hear a voice say, "No. You don't want to do that," and then "Remember that what you are feeling now you will not be feeling later." The voice seemed to come from the outside; it was a man's voice, though whose she did not know. She said, faintly, "Who said that?" There was no answer, but a "granular" figure (as she put it) materialized in the chair opposite her ó a young man in eighteenth-century dress who glimmered for a few seconds and then disappeared. A feeling of immense relief and joy came over her. Although Liz knew that the voice must have come from the deepest part of herself, she speaks of it, playfully, as her "guardian angel."

Various explanations have been offered for why people hear voices, and different ones may apply in different circumstances. It seems likely, for example, that the predominantly hostile or persecuting voices of psychosis have a very different basis from the hearing of one's own name called in an empty house; and that this again is different in origin from the voices which come in emergencies or desperate situations.

Auditory hallucinations may be associated with abnormal activation of the primary auditory cortex; this is a subject which needs much more investigation not only in those with psychosis but in the population at large ó the vast majority of studies so far have examined only auditory hallucinations in psychiatric patients.

Some researchers have proposed that auditory hallucinations result from a failure to recognize internally generated speech as one's own (or perhaps it stems from a cross-activation with the auditory areas so that what most of us experience as our own thoughts becomes "voiced").

Perhaps there is some sort of physiological barrier or inhibition that normally prevents most of us from "hearing" such inner voices as external. Perhaps that barrier is somehow breached or undeveloped in those who do hear constant voices. Perhaps, however, one should invert the question ó and ask why most of us do not hear voices. Julian Jaynes, in his influential 1976 book,The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, speculated that, not so long ago, all humans heard voices ó generated internally, from the right hemisphere of the brain, but perceived (by the left hemisphere) as if external, and taken as direct communications from the gods. Sometime around 1000 B.C., Jaynes proposed, with the rise of modern consciousness, the voices became internalized and recognized as our own.

Others have proposed that auditory hallucinations may come from an abnormal attention to the subvocal stream which accompanies verbal thinking. It is clear that "hearing voices" and "auditory hallucinations" are terms that cover a variety of different phenomena.

While voices carry meaning ó whether this is trivial or portentous ó some auditory hallucinations consist of little more than odd noises. Probably the most common of these are classified as tinnitus, an almost nonstop hissing or ringing sound that often goes with hearing loss, and may be intolerably loud at times.

Hearing noises or hummings, mutterings, twitterings, rappings, rustlings, ringings, muffled voices or is commonly associated with hearing problems, and this may be aggravated by many factors, including delirium, dementia, toxins, or stress. When medical residents, for example, are on call for long periods, sleep deprivation may produce a variety of hallucinations involving any sensory modality. One young neurologist wrote to me that after being on call for more than thirty hours, he would hear the hospital's telemetry and ventilator alarms, and sometimes after arriving home he kept hallucinating the phone ringing.

Although musical phrases or songs may be heard along with voices or other noises, a great many people "hear" only music or musical phrases. Musical hallucinations may arise from a stroke, a tumor, an aneurysm, an infectious disease, a neurodegenerative process, or toxic or metabolic disturbances. Hallucinations in such situations usually disappear as soon as the provocative cause is treated or subsides.

Sometimes it is difficult to pinpoint a particular cause for musical hallucinations, but in the predominantly geriatric population I work with, by far the commonest cause of musical hallucination is hearing loss or deafness ó and here the hallucinations may be stubbornly persistent, even if the hearing is improved by hearing aids or cochlear implants. Diane G. wrote to me:

I have had tinnitus as far back as I can remember. It is present almost 24/7 and is very high pitched. It sounds exactly like how cicadas sound when they come in droves back on Long Island in the summer. Sometime in the last year [I also became aware of] the music playing in my head. I kept hearing Bing Crosby, friends and orchestra singing "White Christmas" over and over. I thought it was coming from a radio playing in another room until I eliminated all possibilities of outside input. It went on for days, and I quickly discovered that I could not turn it off or vary the volume. But I could vary the lyrics, speed and harmonies with practice. Since that time I get the music almost daily, usually toward evenings and at times so loud that it interferes with my hearing conversations. The music is always melodies that I am familiar with such as hymns, favorites from years of piano playing and songs from early memories. They always have the lyrics. . . .

To add to this cacophony, I now have started hearing a third level of sound at the same time that sounds like someone is listening to talk radio or TV in another room. I get a constant running of voices, male and female, complete with realistic pauses, inflections and increases and decreases in volume. I just can't understand their words.

Diane has had progressive hearing loss since childhood, and she is unusual in that she has hallucinations of both music and conversation.

There is a wide range in the quality of individual musical hallucinations ó sometimes they are soft, sometimes disturbingly loud; sometimes simple, sometimes complex ó but there are certain characteristics common to all of them. First and foremost, they are perceptual in quality and seem to emanate from an external source; in this way they are distinct from imagery (even "earworms," the often annoying, repetitious musical imagery that most of us are prone to from time to time). People with musical hallucinations will often search for an external cause ó a radio, a neighbor's television, a band in the street ó and only when they fail to find any such external source do they realize that the source must be in themselves. Thus they may liken it to a tape recorder or an iPod in the brain, something mechanical and autonomous, not a controllable, integral part of the self.

That there should be something like this in one's head arouses bewilderment and, not infrequently, fear ó fear that one is going mad or that the phantom music may be a sign of a tumor, a stroke, or a dementia. Such fears often inhibit people from acknowledging that they have hallucinations; perhaps for this reason musical hallucinations have long been considered rare ó but it is now realized that this is far from the case.

Musical hallucinations can intrude upon and even overwhelm perception; like tinnitus, they can be so loud as to make it impossible to hear someone speak (imagery never competes with perception in this way).

Musical hallucinations often appear suddenly, with no apparent trigger. Frequently, however, they follow a tinnitus or an external noise (like the drone of a plane engine or a lawn mower), the hearing of real music, or anything suggestive of a particular piece or style of music. Sometimes they are triggered by external associations, as with one patient of mine who, whenever she passed a French bakery, would hear the song "Alouette, gentille alouette."

Some people have musical hallucinations virtually nonstop, while others have them only intermittently. The hallucinated music is usually familiar (though not always liked; thus one of my patients hallucinated Nazi marching songs from his youth, which terrified him). It may be vocal or instrumental, classical or popular, but it is most often music heard in the patient's early years. Occasionally, patients may hear "meaningless phrases and patterns," as one of my correspondents, a gifted musician, put it.

Hallucinated music can be very detailed, so that every note in a piece, every instrument in an orchestra, is distinctly heard. Such detail and accuracy is often astonishing to the hallucinator, who may be scarcely able, normally, to hold a simple tune in his head, let alone an elaborate choral or instrumental composition. (Perhaps there is an analogy here to the extreme clarity and unusual detail which characterize many visual hallucinations.) Often a single theme, perhaps only a few bars, is hallucinated again and again, like a skipping record. One patient of mine heard part of "O Come, All Ye Faithful" nineteen and a half times in ten minutes (her husband timed this) and was tormented by never hearing the entire hymn. Hallucinatory music can wax slowly in intensity and then slowly wane, but it may also come on suddenly full blast in mid-bar and then stop with equal suddenness (like a switch turned on and off, patients often comment). Some patients may sing along with their musical hallucinations; others ignore them ó it makes no difference. Musical hallucinations continue in their own way, irrespective of whether one attends to them or not. And they can continue, pursuing their own course, even if one is listening to or playing something else. Thus Gordon B., a violinist, sometimes hallucinated a piece of music while he was actually performing an entirely different piece at a concert.

Musical hallucinations tend to spread. A familiar tune, an old song, may start the process; this is likely to be joined, over a period of days or weeks, by another song, and then another, until a whole repertoire of hallucinatory music has been built up. And this repertoire itself tends to change ó one tune will drop out, and another will replace it. One cannot voluntarily start or stop the hallucinations, though some people may be able, on occasion, to replace one piece of hallucinated music with another. Thus one man who said he had "an intracranial jukebox" found that he could switch at will from one "record" to another, provided there was some similarity of style or rhythm, though he could not turn on or turn off the "jukebox" as a whole.

Prolonged silence or auditory monotony may also cause auditory hallucinations; I have had patients report experiencing these while on meditation retreats or on a long sea voyage. Jessica K., a young woman with no hearing loss, wrote to me that her hallucinations come with auditory monotony:

In the presence of white noise such as running water or a central air conditioning system, I frequently hear music or voices. I hear it distinctly (and in the early days, often went searching for the radio that must have been left on in another room), but in the instance of music with lyrics or voices (which always sound like a talk radio program or something, not real conversation) I never hear it well enough to distinguish the words. I never hear these things unless they are "embedded," so to speak, in white noise, and only if there are not other competing sounds.

Musical hallucinations seem to be less common in children, but one boy I have seen, Michael, has had them since the age of five or six. His music is nonstop and overwhelming, and it often prevents him from focusing on anything else. Much more often, musical hallucinations are acquired at a later age ó unlike hearing voices, which seems, in those who have it, to begin in early childhood and to last a lifetime.

Some people with persistent musical hallucinations find them tormenting, but most people accommodate and learn to live with the music forced on them, and a few even come to enjoy their internal music and may feel it as an enrichment of life.

Ivy L., a lively and articulate eighty-five-year-old, has had some visual hallucinations related to her macular degeneration, and some musical and auditory hallucinations stemming from her hearing impairment. Mrs. L. wrote to me:

In 2008 my doctor prescribed paroxetine for what she called depression and I called sadness. I had moved from St. Louis to Massachusetts after my husband died. A week after starting paroxetine, while watching the Olympics, I was surprised to hear languid music with the men's swim races. When I turned off the TV, the music continued and has been present virtually every waking minute since.

When the music began, a doctor gave me Zyprexa as a possible aid. That brought a visual hallucination of a murky, bubbling brown ceiling at night. A second prescription gave me hallucinations of lovely, transparent tropical plants growing in my bathroom. So I quit taking these prescriptions and the visual hallucinations ceased. The music continued.

I do not simply "recall" these songs. The music playing in the house is as loud and clear as any CD or concert. The volume increases in a large space such as a supermarket. The music has no singers or words. I have never heard "voices" but once heard my name called urgently, while I was dozing.

There was a short time when I "heard" doorbells, phones, and alarm clocks ring although none were ringing. I no longer experience these. In addition to music, at times I hear katydids, sparrows, or the sound of a large truck idling at my right side.

During all these experiences, I am fully aware that they are not real. I continue to function, managing my accounts and finances, moving my residence, taking care of my household. I speak coherently while experiencing these aural and visual disturbances. My memory is quite accurate, except for the occasional misplaced paper.

I can "enter" a melody I think of or have one triggered by a phrase, but I cannot stop the aural hallucinations. So I cannot stop the "piano" in the coat closet, the "clarinet" in the living room ceiling, the endless "God Bless America"s, or waking up to "Good Night, Irene." But I manage.

PET and fMRI scanning have shown that musical hallucination, like actual musical perception, is associated with the activation of an extensive network involving many areas of the brain ó auditory areas, motor cortex, visual areas, basal ganglia, cerebellum, hippocampi, and amygdala. (Music calls upon many more areas of the brain than any other activity ó one reason why music therapy is useful for such a wide variety of conditions.) This musical network can be stimulated directly, on occasion, as by a focal epilepsy, a fever, or delirium, but what seems to occur in most cases of musical hallucinations is a release of activity in the musical network when normally operative inhibitions or constraints are weakened. The commonest cause of such a release is auditory deprivation or deafness. In this way, the musical hallucinations of the elderly deaf are analogous to the visual hallucinations of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

But although the musical hallucinations of deafness and the visual hallucinations of CBS may be akin physiologically, they have great differences phenomenologically, and these reflect the very different nature of our visual worlds and our musical worlds ó differences evident in the ways we perceive, recollect, or imagine them. We are not given an already made, preassembled visual world; we have to construct our own visual world as best we can. This construction entails analysis and synthesis at many functional levels in the brain, starting with perception of lines and angles and orientation in the occipital cortex. At higher levels, in the inferotemporal cortex, the "elements" of visual perception are of a more complex sort, appropriate for the analysis and recognition of natural scenes, objects, animal and plant forms, letters, and faces. Complex visual hallucinations entail the putting together of such elements, an act of assemblage, and these assemblages are continually permuted, disassembled, and reassembled.

Musical hallucinations are quite different. With music, although there are separate functional systems for perceiving pitch, timbre, rhythm, etc., the musical networks of the brain work together, and pieces cannot be significantly altered in melodic contour or tempo or rhythm without losing their musical identity. We apprehend a piece of music as a whole. Whatever the initial processes of musical perception and memory may be, once a piece of music is known, it is retained not as an assemblage of individual elements but as a completed procedure or performance; music isperformed by the mind/brain whenever it is recollected; and this is also so when it erupts spontaneously, whether as an earworm or as a hallucination.


From Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks. Copyright 2012 by Oliver Sacks. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc.
Saturday, 18 January 2014 04:21

Page 4: Freakscience - Indian Spirituality

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity:
 


Nowadays Goa attracts mainly party people and tourists. Back in the times, travellers visited India had to pass a long way
- Hippy Trial ( The Hystory of Hippy Trial read here), sleeping bus, local train and even a dodgy boat from Mumbai.
Passing through all country they had no choice but be inspired by the magic and deepness of Indian culture, religion and spiritual practics.

 Let's see what  Indian Spirituality is about.
As the global community becomes increasingly capitalistic, the quest for spirituality grows in urgency.  India, its people, its infrastructure, and indeed its very soil, encourage and breed Spiritualism, allowing religions to thrive, flourish and prosper.
India boasts the presence of every major religion in the world, as well many of their off-shoots and facets, all being supported, nourished, and living in comparative harmony. Many of these religions were conceived in India, and others have come to India seeking a safe haven from persecution after being created in their own lands. The age-old environment has always supported such freedom of belief. We will thus find Judaism, Islam, The Bah·'Ì Faith, Christianity, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism amoungst the major religions being practiced in India, together with a variety of The Lesser Known Religions.
Since religion is the most enduring preservative of social customs, architecture, diet, thought and way of life, you will consequently find an unparalleled variety of customs, architecture, diet, thought and way of life in India.
Whether you define spiritualism as "having something to do with the spirit or soul" (for example "an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace given unto usî), "caring much for things of the spirit or soul", (such as "men are they who see that spirituality is stronger than any material force"), or "having to do with spirits; supernatural" ("Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth unseen"), you will find all of your senses saturated by spiritualism in India.
The diversity of Indiaís cultural heritage is demonstrated by the fact that apart from Hindi and English being the main languages of the country, there are an ADDITIONAL 17 languages recognized for official purposes: Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu and Urdu - (just take a look at an Indian bank note!)
Spirituality and mystical charm have always drawn people from all over the world to India. As the world becomes increasingly capitalistic and materialist, the quest and urgency for spirituality grows more and more. The traditional Indian way of life has helped in the evolution and growth of Spiritualism. Numerous cultures and religions have thrived and flourished together for ages and resulted into the unique Indian way of life.
At different points in the history of our civilization numerous spiritual leaders and saints have delivered the message of peace, brotherhood and co existence that is so very well rooted in our culture. Arts like Yoga and Ayurveda coupled with religion have played an important role in the evolution and existence of spirituality in India. Through the ages, various Ashrams and centers of excellence came up in different parts of India. These centers have helped in spreading the message of compassion, care and positive living.

Thus, Indian spirituality is all about showing respect to all living beings-animals trees, rocks and even water and lead a positive and healthy life. It is believed that the supreme Creator has put each one of us in this world for a purpose and that purpose is to be compassionate, caring and loving to one-another. As mentioned earlier, the great Indian spiritual personalities and gurus have played an important role in spreading the message of love, care and the need for positive living all over the world.

New Belief in God is an inseparable part of the Indian philosophy. Intertwined with its sheer spiritualism, Indian philosophy stands as an emblem of ultimate consciousness. The very presence of the metaphysical God, ideally unifies with the absolute reality in Indian philosophy whilst reverberating the aura of spiritualism in the most eloquent way.
The inviolate Truth about spirituality in the form of God or Ishvara is imparted in the Bhagvad Gita, the Ultimate Literature of Life, as it has been reckoned. In Gita, the words of Lord Krishna, echoes the authentic aura of spirituality, which delicately defines the Indian Philosophy as a "spiritual journey". The presence of God as the supreme power, the concept of "Omnipresence of the Omnipotent" therefore finds a divine dimension amidst the concept of Indian philosophy. Indian philosophy suggests that all that exists in this universe is the ultimate manifestation of God. The words of Krishna further support this. As Krishna says:

"I am the original fragrance of earth and the heat of fire. I am the life of all that lives and I am the penance of all seekers. I am the consciousness of all who have developed their consciousness. I am the splendor of all which is fine."

This is the part where Indian philosophy ultimately offers a definite contour to the term "Spirituality". As this is when, finally the emergence of that Ultimate Consciousness of the Greatest Knowledge happens which leads one towards felicity and towards that eternal bliss. This is the very halo of spiritualism in Indian philosophy, which finally binds the religiosity and the phantasmal elements with that sheer thread of tenet and feelings. Indian philosophy is therefore a religious tradition. The pride of the Indian philosophy again lies in that magical blend of the concept of reality or in that absolute reality with that of the existence of personal God which ultimately leads to a meaningful life. This immense fusion further crafts Indian philosophy as the most tolerant religions. Ishvara is the very core of Indian Philosophy.
Ishvara in Sanskrit means, the Lord. In Indian philosophy therefore Ishvara is reckoned as the ultimate Ruler , the supreme power and is indeed the preternatural Being of the Cosmos :
"The whole of this Universe is pervaded by me in my Unmanifested form (Avyaktamoorti). I am thus the support of all the manifested existences, but I am not supported by them" - this eternal law is the very basis of Indian philosophy and is also the main concept of spiritualism in India.

God is the creator, the preserver and the destroyer of the cosmos. He is the divinity and this very idea is the crux of Indian philosophy. The concept of Brahman in Indian philosophy again offers a rather spiritual facet to Indian philosophy; as according to Krishna " . ...Into Brahman I plant the seed giving birth to all living beings..." Brahman therefore remains as the logo of the Divine essence of the cosmos. The reference of Brahman is there also in Mundaka Upanishad, which structures the base of the Indian philosophy.

The ideal harmonization of spiritualism and religiosity in Indian beliefs makes the Indian philosophy a never-ending journey in understanding the "Knowledge" of that perpetual contentment. God is the ultimate reality; the unchallengeable, the huge, the brightest light who is there almost everywhere --- even in the green grass, in the bight fire, in the living air, in the round ocean, in the blue sky and finally in the mind of man. To experience His immortality, to feel His presence and to sense His enigmatic immensity the pious man plunges into the ocean of consciousness whilst praying.

"Lead me from the unreal to the Real. Lead me from darkness unto Light. Lead me from death to Immortality."

 
Saturday, 11 January 2014 15:34

Page 4: Freakscience - Lsd Therapy

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Why Doctors Can't Give You LSD (But Maybe They Should)
 

When David Nichols earned a Ph.D in medicinal chemistry from the University of Iowa in 1973 by studying psychedelics, he thought he would continue studying hallucinogens indefinitely. "I thought I would work on it for the rest of my life," he says.

His timing was less than fortuitous. In 1970, the year after Nichols started grad school, Richard Nixon signed into law the Controlled Substances Act, designed to clamp down on the manufacture and distribution of drugs in the U.S. The act classified hallucinogenic substances like LSD, DMT, psilocybin (the psychedelic alkaloid in mushrooms) and mescaline as Schedule I substances--the most restrictive use category, reserved for drugs with high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use. Marijuana was also placed in this category, and 15 years later when ecstasy came onto the scene, MDMA was emergency-classified as a Schedule I substance as well. By contrast, cocaine, opium and morphine are Schedule II substances, meaning they can be prescribed by a doctor.

Despite some promising results from trials of psychedelics in treating alcoholism, psychiatric conditions and modeling mental illness, by the early '70s, the government had tightened control of Schedule I substances, even for research. It's only now that we're starting to return to the notion that these drugs could be medicine.

If you wanted to kill your career, you did research on psychedelics.
Starting in the early '90s, and as more scientists prove it's feasible, increasingly in the last decade, researchers have been approved to conduct clinical trials with human subjects, and there are promising results showing that substances like MDMA could be useful in treating depression and curing PTSD, and that classical psychedelics like psilocybin and LSD could be a way to soothe anxiety in the terminally ill, treat alcoholism and more. But it's still far from an easy field to break into.

***

In 1938, a Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann synthesized LSD for the first time while studying ergots, a type of fungus. Though the pharmaceutical company that he worked for, Sandoz, didn't have any interest in the compound, Hofmann found himself inexplicably drawn to it. Five years later, in the spring of 1943, he synthesized it again, noticing that it seemed to have unusual properties: After accidentally absorbing small amounts through his fingertips one day in the lab, Hofmann had to leave work early, under the effects of what he called "a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition." A few days later, he experimented with taking what he thought was a small dose of LSD, about 250 micrograms (a common dose now is more on the order of 100 micrograms), and proceeded to trip out of his mind, an experience he describes in his book LSD: My Problem Child.

Thinking that it could have medical uses, Hofmann and fellow researchers at Sandoz research laboratories began testing LSD in animals, and in 1947, the first paper looking at psychiatric LSD use in was published. Researchers saw in acid the potential to model psychotic disorders in healthy brains--a way for psychiatrists to induce in themselves the kinds of sensations their patients experienced as a result of mental illness. It could also be a way to break down boundaries, freeing the mind so patients could open up in psychotherapy.

Despite its current reputation, LSD wasn't just for the Beatles and California hippies, it was seen as "an invaluable weapon to psychiatrists," as Time magazine called it in 1955. Research varied widely in legitimacy, but LSD was tested on an estimated 40,000 people around the world between 1950 and 1963.

The CIA saw insidious potential in LSD: They thought it could be a route to mind control.
In 1953, a pair of Canadian researchers tried to use high doses of LSD to scare alcoholics into sobriety, but discovered it instead produced a kind of mystical, near-religious experience for them that convinced them to stop drinking. They were onto something: A 2012 meta-analysis of LSD-alcoholism trials found though many of the trials from the late 1960s were too small to produce statistically-viable results on their own, in conjunction, they showed consistent, positive results.

At the same time, the government was also dipping its toes in an acid-filled pool. The CIA saw a more insidious potential in LSD: They thought it could be a truth serum or a route to mind control. Josef Mengele and other Nazi doctors had experimented on concentration camp prisoners with mescaline and other psychotropic drugs.In the midst of Cold War paranoia, the U.S. Navy thought mescaline could be used to get people to reveal information against their will. When the experiments ultimately proved unsuccessful, the government turned to Albert Hofmann's new wonder drug, already beginning to emerge as a psychiatric juggernaut.

LSD Blotter
 
DEA

Between 1953 and 1964, in a project called MKULTRA, the CIA experimented with LSD on unwitting civilians, prisoners, government employees and even its own agents, in a manner that Senator Edward Kennedy later described to Congress as making "little scientific sense." It came to the point where "surprise acid trips became something of an occupational hazard among CIA operatives," as Martin Lee and Bruce Shlain describe in Acid Dreams.

The agents monitoring the experiments weren't scientists, and at least one person died after jumping out of a window under the influence of LSD. By the time the Senate held hearings on MKULTRA in 1977, many documents related to the operation had been destroyed on the orders of then-CIA Director Richard Helms in 1973.

Disturbed by the CIA's abuses, Congress restricted the use of hallucinogens like LSD to scientific research in 1965. By that point, the tide was already turning against psychedelics, in part due to unethical behavior (referred to by one contemporary researcher as "excessive enthusiasm") by some of the scientists studying them. Timothy Leary, a psychologist and the psychedelic advocate of "Turn on, tune in, drop out" fame," lost his appointment at Harvard University in 1963 due to the administration's concerns that he and other Harvard Psilocybin Project researchers were sloppy in their scientific approach, even conducting investigations under the influence of psilocybin themselves, and after giving an undergraduate student psilocybin off-campus.

Political motives, too, added to the pressure to halt hallucinogenic research like Leary's, even though it had been surprisingly successful in some aspects, like in reducing prisoner recidivism with psilocybin. LSD, psilocybin and other psychedelics were playing a vital role in a rising countercultural movement, as the forthcoming Albert Hofmann biography Mystic Chemist points out. They were agents of peace and love in a time when the government desperately needed soldiers for the Vietnam War, a war young people were increasingly refusing to serve in. In 1966 the U.S., soon followed by the rest of the world, made LSD illegal. Even the most promising psychedelic research slowed, and by the mid-70s, stopped.

***

This was the world David Nichols faced when he emerged from his Ph.D. program brandishing a dissertation on psychedelic drugs. "If you wanted to kill your research career in academics, you did research on psychedelics," Nichols remembers. To some extent, that's still true, because psychedelic research remains difficult to fund. As a distinguished professor at Purdue University, Nichols received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for 30 years to look into how exactly how these drugs work in the body. But since the organization concentrates specifically on stopping drug use, he couldn't study their potential medical properties.

As psychiatrist Charles Grob wrote in a 1994 article in the Yearbook for Ethnomedicine and the Study of Consciousness:

Together with revelations of unethical activities of psychiatric researchers under contract to military intelligence and the CIA, the highly publicized and controversial behaviors of hallucinogen enthusiasts led to the repression of efforts to formally investigate these substances. For the next twenty-five years research with hallucinogens assumed pariah status within academic psychiatry, virtually putting an end to formal dialogue and debate.

In the early '90s, Nichols was at a scientific meeting telling a story he had told a million times: It's too bad there's not any clinical research, research with human subjects, with psychedelics. "You could do it, but you need private money." He decided he could find that private money, even though he didn't have the medical degree necessary to do clinical research himself. Along with Grob and others, he founded the Heffter Research Institute in 1993 to do legitimate, rigorous scientific research on psychedelics.

For many years when the FDA got a protocol to study psychedelics in humans, they just put it on a shelf somewhere.
Grob, a professor at the UCLA Medical School, was one of the first researchers to get FDA approval to conduct a research study on the therapeutic effects of psychedelics since research had slowed to a halt 35 years earlier. He was interested in using psilocybin (a drug with less political baggage than LSD or even MDMA) to ease the anxieties and depression in cancer patients with limited life expectancy.

So what changed? According to Nichols, now an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, there wasn't an abrupt change in regulations, but just a slow shift in attitudes. "For many years when [the FDA] got a protocol to study psychedelics in humans, they just put it on a shelf somewhere."

Animal-based research went on, because the government was still interested in figuring out how these chemicals functioned, but "the presumption was that was impossible to do with humans," according to Mark Geyer, another Heffter Research Institute founder who has been studying the basic neuroscience of psychedelics on animals for almost 30 years with funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Even if the FDA had been willing to approve psychedelic trials with humans, there probably weren't many applications being submitted, because researchers assumed it couldn't be done.

"The goal wasn't to stop scientists, the goal was to stop street use… but the side effect of that was that even legitimate research was curtailed," Geyer explains. "It turns out, as I understand… there was no law on the books that forbade such research."

According to Nichols, sometime in the early '90s, a turnover in leadership loosened the agency's attitude toward human-based trials with psychedelics. After years of lobbying the federal government for permission, psychiatrist Rick Strassman was able to do a study with human subjects of the psychedelic compound DMT.

"Legitimate human research with hallucinogenic drugs, although of great theoretical and practical interest, involves daunting regulatory hurdles that have discouraged investigators from attempting such work," Strassman complained in a 1991 article for the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Nevertheless, his study, involving 60 volunteers and hundreds of doses of DMT, didn't bring the world crashing around the FDA's ears, opening up the possibility that the agency might approve more clinical trials with psychedelics.

With the Heffter Research Institute, Grob designed and received FDA approval for a small trial to administer psilocybin to 12 terminal cancer patients between 30 and 60 years old. The patients came in for two sessions a month apart -- but everyone received a dose of psilocybin at one of the two sessions. "We didn't feel it was ethical to deny anyone the active treatment because they had limited life expectancy," Grob explains.

Because it was the first study to use psilocybin in decades, the FDA approved a very low dosage for the study. "People were not floridly hallucinating," according to Grob, but the effect was instead more like a waking dream. After a six-month follow-up, the subjects showed a significant, lasting reduction in anxiety. The study paved the way for other research into using psilocybin to ease end-of-life anxieties at Johns Hopkins University and NYU.

Psychedelic Medicine

A patient receives MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD during an ongoing study in South Carolina.

Courtesy MAPS
***

Though Strassman proved clinical research to be both legal and possible, it's still not an easy process for scientists. That's part of the reason groups like the Heffter Research Institute and the Santa Cruz, Calif.-based Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) exist: They have the resources and the motivation to wade through seemingly endless bureaucratic hurdles to move studies forward. The Heffter Research Institute can advise a researcher on what has worked in previous trials, and they provide a peer-review process for proposals. If their protocol is approved, the organization seeks private funding for it.

"It takes years to get all the approvals," as Grob says. His first study took a particularly long time to receive approval, though now that multiple studies have established safety parameters and feasibility for these types of trials, the process is somewhat smoother.

You have to really want to work with hallucinogens.
For studies involving people, not only does the research have to be approved by the university's institutional review board, as do most clinical trials, but it also has to be approved by the FDA and the researcher must be licensed to store and work with the drug by the DEA. The DEA requires intense security when it comes to storing the drugs, lest any resourceful college student try to relieve your lab of its drugs, and the licenses are specifically issued to one researcher in one lab--if you move rooms, you'll have to get the DEA's approval.

In clinical work, the drugs have to be manufactured in a specific pharmaceutical-grade manner to ensure quality. Though there aren't the same manufacturing standards, you also need the same Schedule I license to work with animals as you do with humans, even though less than one human dose of MDMA, for example, could supply a study with hundreds of mice.

"You have to really want to work with these," says Nichols, whose lab at Purdue made much of the clinical-grade hallucinogens for other researchers' trials. "Anybody who's a good chemist could probably do it, but there's no money in it."

Currently, according to the DEA, it takes about 9 months to get FDA and DEA approval for a license to research Schedule I substances, though researchers are a little more skeptical. "The DEA's not in a hurry to grant these licenses," according to Nichols.

Only 349 scientists have them, and that number is on the downswing: Three years ago, there were 550 licenses in the U.S. Nichols suggests that this could be a result of the DEA cracking down on researchers with extraneous licenses. In the past, Schedule I licenses had been renewed on a yearly basis without much fuss, but in recent years the agency has required Nichols to submit his current protocol and justify why he still needs the license.

***

Part of the problem with studying psychedelics--and other illicit drugs, such as marijuana--for medical use, is simply that they're not high-tech, and no pharmaceutical company needs or wants to get involved. There's no money in it for them. Though drugs like LSD and psilocybin are relatively easy to make in the lab, as MAPS founder Rick Doblin pointed out in a 2012 interview, "psychedelics are off-patent, can't be monopolized, and compete with other psychiatric medications that people take daily."

"My colleagues say to me, in these days of nanotechology and targeted therapy, what are you doing?" says Donald Abrams, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco who has done research on medical marijuana. "We live in the 21st century. Studying plants as medicine is not where most investigators are putting their money."

And without the outside funding to continue researching, a scientist's career goes nowhere, so even fewer scientists want to get involved.

Organizations like the Heffter Research Institute and MAPS are funded by private donors and don't have the money to do the expensive, large-scale human trials that could show sound results one way or the other. Nichols hopes that federal funding will be available to do larger studies with psychedelics sometime in the next decade, if the ongoing smaller trials can show efficacy. "There's movement toward accepting the possibility that these [psychedelic substances] are useful and not all that dangerous," he says.

The stigma persists, though. "It's still harder for somebody to get involved in psychedelic research, in terms of professionally and funding," says MAPS communications director Brad Burge.

And although psychedelic research has made some headway in England and Switzerland, roadblocks against psychedelic research exist abroad, too. The first clinical trial using psilocybin to treat depression stalled in early April because U.K. regulations require drugs used in clinical trials to be made under strict Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards, and the researchers, from Imperial College London, have been unable to find a company to manufacture psilocybin at that standard.

"The law for the control of drugs like psilocybin as a Schedule 1 Class A drug makes it almost impossible to use them for research," Nutt said in a press statement. "The reason we haven't started the study is because finding companies who could manufacture the drug and who are prepared to go through the regulatory hoops to get the license, which can take up to a year and triple the price, is proving very difficult. The whole situation is bedeviled by this primitive, old-fashioned attitude that Schedule 1 drugs could never have therapeutic potential, and so they have to be made impossible to access."

There's a growing generation of students and researchers who aren't scared of studying the drugs.Yet despite the hurdles, for some researchers, the potential to cure some of our most troubling woes--like alcoholism, depression and PTSD--make the headaches of doing legitimate psychedelic science worthwhile. Later this week, around 1600 scientists from around the world devoted to this research will descend upon Oakland, Calif. to attend Psychedelic Science 2013, a three-day conference put on in part by MAPS and the Heffter Research Institute.

As Burge notes, the stigma that has haunted psychedelic science could be changing as a new generation of scientists arrive on the scene. "There's a generation of researchers and therapists that worked in the 1960s and '70s," he says, "but also there's this huge and growing generation of students and researchers who aren't scared of studying the drugs...looking for treatments to our most debilitating epidemics."

Friday, 03 January 2014 20:45

Page 4: Freakscience - Energy-Matter

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UNITING SCIENCE AND SPIRITUALITY.

We think that is is a very important aspect of our relations between the Nature and the Human.

Energy-Matter

Perhaps the most important discovery ever to made in the world of physics was Einstein's theory of relativity and his famous equation E = mc2. The equation reveals that 1 kilogram of matter corresponds to 25,000,000,000 kWh of energy, which could power a town for 3 years or a car for 100,000 years. The equation shows that energy and matter are different manifestations of the same thing. It shows that there is only one substance "energy-matter", which has a dual nature and can manifest as energy or matter. The same can be said about light, which can either display the behaviour of a wave or the behaviour of a particle. This does not mean that light changes back and forth between waves and particles at will, but that it is in some intermediate state which can express both aspects simultaneously. It is possible that sub-atomic particles of matter are actually standing waves of energy. Low frequency waves vibrate slowly and behave like matter, and high frequency waves vibrate rapidly and behave like energy. This clearly has some similarities with "string theory" where everything is believed to be composed of incredibly minute (10-33 centimetres long, or about a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a centimetre) strings or loops of energy-matter vibrating in ten dimensions. Our brains can only comprehend four dimensions – the three spatial dimensions (length, width and height) and one temporal dimension (time). So there may be six hidden spatial dimensions. The cosmologies of eastern religions are based around seven planes of existence with our physical plane being the lowest. Of the six higher planes, some are said to be composed of subtle matter and some of pure energy. So it seems that modern physics is beginning to discover what has been known in the East for millennia.

Higher Dimensions

As we have just discussed, some of the current theories of fundamental physics state that there are hidden spatial dimensions beyond the three that we live in. It is impossible to even imagine what a higher dimension would be like, but to get some idea think of Dr Who's TARDIS, which was bigger on the inside than it was on the outside. Or you could imagine a house with a special room that is much bigger than the whole house – the room is so big in fact, it is the size of a mansion. Then imagine that this mansion also has special rooms which are the size of even bigger mansions, and so on. I believe this is what Christ was referring to when he said, "In my father's house are many mansions" (John 14:2). We know that God lives in heaven, so Christ is saying that the heavens are multi-dimensional and that each higher realm is more expansive than the last. Think about it – could you come up with a simpler description to explain a multi-dimensional universe in a non-scientific manner to the people of 2000 years ago?

Missing Matter

Studies on the rotation of stars around galaxies have shown that 96% of the universe is unaccounted for. In theory, stars on the outer rim of a galaxy should not be able to rotate as fast as those near the centre, because the increased centrifugal force would cause them to fly off into outer space. However, it has been found that stars on the rim of a galaxy do rotate just as fast as those in the centre, which contradicts the laws of physics! So scientists had to come up with a new theory that would take this into account. The mass of all the visible matter within a galaxy only provides 4% of the gravitational field that is required to stop it from literally ripping itself apart. So why aren't all the galaxies flying apart? In the mid 1970s physicists and astronomers started looking for the missing matter of the universe. They called it "dark matter" because it is not visible. More recently the discovery of vast spherical energy auras, which totally encircle the galactic disc, indicates the presence of a large mass of dark matter and dark energy outside the galactic nucleus. Dark energy is a hypothetical form of energy which permeates all of space and has strong negative pressure, which explains the accelerating expansion of the universe. It is a relatively new concept that forms part of the "Standard Model", which states that the universe is composed of approximately 4% visible matter, 23% dark matter and 73% dark energy. This dark matter and energy is the energy-matter of the aforementioned higher planes of Hindu and Buddhist cosmologies and the hidden spatial dimensions of string theory.

Quantum Foam

Quantum foam, also known as space-time foam, is a concept in quantum physics proposed by Nobel physicist John Wheeler in 1955 to describe the microscopic sea of bubbling energy-matter. The foam is what space-time would look like if we could zoom in to a scale of 10-33 centimetres (the Planck length). At this microscopic scale particles of matter appear to be nothing more than standing waves of energy. Wheeler proposed that minute wormholes measuring 10-33 centimetres could exist in the quantum foam, which some physicists theorise could even be hyper-spatial links to other dimensions. The hyper-spatial nature of the quantum foam could account for principles like the transmission of light and the flow of time. Various scientists believe that quantum foam is an incredibly powerful source of zero-point energy, and it has been estimated that one cubic centimetre of empty space contains enough energy to boil all the world's oceans. If we could describe a microscopic standing wave pattern that appeared particle-like and incorporated a vortex within its structure, we might have a theory that could unite all the current variants in modern physics. Figure 2a appears to meet these criteria. It is a drawing of a subatomic particle reproduced from Occult Chemistry by Charles Leadbeater and Annie Besant which was first published in 1909, although a similar diagram was published in a theosophical journal in 1895. Leadbeater and Besant explain that each subatomic particle is composed of ten loops which circulate energy from higher dimensions. Back in 1895, they knew that physical matter was composed from "strings" – 10 years before Einstein's theory of relativity and 80 years before string theory. The structure of energy-matter may have been known for over 100 years, yet completely ignored by conventional science. Figure 2a may be the "holy grail" that physicists have long been searching for – see Chapter 5 for further details.

 

Subatomic Particle

Figure 2a - Subatomic Particle

We Are All One

The universe is believed to have sprung into existence from a singularity (a single point). The singularity expanded to become the universe, so everything still remains a part of that singularity. With this interpretation the paradoxes of non-locality and faster-than-light communication become meaningless because everything is connected and everything is one – a concept that is by no means new to spirituality.

The Big Bang and Cosmic Inflation

Cosmic inflation theory states that the universe is not expanding into space; rather space itself is expanding, dragging stars and galaxies in its wake. A simple analogy is that of a balloon, representing space-time, with some dots drawn on it to represent the galaxies. When the balloon is inflated the dots move further apart. So the big bang wasn't matter exploding to fill empty space – it was matter, energy and space expanding together into an endless void of nothingness. But where did all the matter come from? The theory of relativity states that matter can neither be created nor destroyed, so if it wasn't created it must have been transformed into matter from energy. But where did the energy come from? It must have always been there and was just reawakened or recycled in the big bang. Ancient eastern religious texts state that the universe goes through cycles of "in-breaths" and "out-breaths". Generally with an explosion there is an initial rapid expansion followed by a gradual slowing down. Not so with the universe – its expansion is accelerating, 14 billion years after the Big Bang! The reason for the acceleration seems to be an increase in the quantity of dark energy, which produces a vacuum effect resulting in evermore rapid expansion. This subsequent influx of energy from a higher source is clearly not what we would expect from a typical explosion. So the Big Bang appears to be under some sort of external control – perhaps the mind of God? If we stay with the assumption that dark energy exists in higher dimensions, it seems that there has been a rush of energy descending into the physical dimension (the out-breath) and that at some point in the future it will return to the higher dimensions and the physical universe will contract or dissolve (the in-breath).

Beyond the Universe

What existed before the universe began, and what, if anything, will exist after the universe ends? Scientists believe that our universe exists within a metaverse (meta-universe). The metaverse is timeless and eternal because it is an absolute void and totally unmanifest. Kabbalah has a term that exactly corresponds to the metaverse: "Ain" is the infinite nothingness; the void; non-existence; the eternal empty background; the zero. The universe is widely believed by scientists to have originated from a singularity, a single point that contains the infinite potential of the universe. Once again Kabbalah has an equivalent term: "Ain Soph" is the limitless (potential); the absolute source of creation; the one. The Hindu term "Brahman" has the same meaning: God unmanifest; the transcendent reality that is the source of all being in this universe; the singularity from which "all that is" originated, including space and time. Our universe has been compared to foam floating on a sea of zero-point energy – an energy so enormous that many physicists ignore it and leave it out of their equations. Zero-point energy is believed to exist at every point in the universe, even in empty space, yet is currently undetectable because it seems to lie just beyond our reality. No prizes for guessing that Kabbalah also has a term to describe it: "Ain Soph Aur" is the infinite light; the infinite energy that manifests our universe. The ancient terms directly correspond to those used in modern physics, so once again science is catching up with ancient spiritual knowledge.

Gravity and Magnetism

Some physicists have suggested that the force of gravity is much weaker than the other forces because it leaks out into hidden dimensions, so that we only feel part of its effect. I suspect the reverse may be true and that gravity originates in a higher dimension and leaks down into our reality, because if it originated here "gravitons" (theoretical particles) would be real and detectable rather than just hypothetical. Science finds it impossible to explain non-physical phenomena such as magnetic fields in physical terms. Magnetic fields are clearly not based upon physical particles because, like gravity, they exert a force even in a vacuum (where no physical particles are present), so scientists have to come up with imaginary particles like "virtual photons" to explain the phenomenon. As with gravity, I believe that magnetic forces originate in higher dimensions and only their effects can be felt in our physical dimension. Extra dimensions are the only logical way to explain all non-physical phenomena.

Black Hole Universe

Physicist Paul Wesson and his team at the University of Waterloo in Canada have calculated that our entire universe could be the inside of a higher-dimensional black hole. The theory provides a better description of the beginning of the universe than the big bang because it accounts for the creation of matter. In Wesson's model, energy from the higher-dimensional universe streams down from the higher universe and condenses to form the matter of our universe. This is consistent with the esoteric system of creation which is fully described in Chapter 5. Wesson's model also predicts that a collapsing universe would bounce back just before it became a singularity, and begin expanding again. This is consistent with the Hindu belief that the universe goes through cycles of "in-breaths" and "out-breaths". Wesson is now considering the idea of "Russian doll universes", with each world embedded in another higher dimensional world, which is exactly how esoterics describe the universe

 

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity:
 
The nature of hallucinations
 
The general theory of hallucinations here delineated rests upon two fundamental assumptions.
One assumption states that life experiences influence the brain in such a way as to leave, in the brain, enduring physical changes that have variously been called neural traces, templates, or engrams. Ideas and images are held to derive from the incorporation and activation of these engrams in complex circuits involving nerve cells. Such circuits in the cortex (outer layers) of the brain appear to subserve the neurophysiology of memory, thought, imagination, and fantasy.
 
The emotions associated with these intellectual and perceptual functions seem to be mediated through cortex connections with the deeper parts of the brain (the limbic system or “visceral brain,” for example), thus permitting a dynamic interplay between perception and emotion through transactions that appear to take place largely at unconscious levels.
 
Conscious awareness is found to be mediated by the ascending midbrain reticular activating system (a network of nerve cells in the brainstem). Analyses of hallucinations reported by sufferers of neurological disorders and by neurosurgical patients in whom the brain is stimulated electrically have shown the importance of the temporal lobes (at the sides of the brain) to auditory hallucinations, for example, and of other functionally relevant parts of the brain in this process.
 
A second assumption states that the total human personality is best understood in terms of the constant interplay of forces that continually emanate from inside (as internal physiological activity) and from outside the individual (as sensory stimuli).
Such transactions between the environment and the individual may be said to exert an integrating and organizing influence upon memory traces stored in the nervous system and to affect the patterns in which sensory engrams are activated to produce experiences called images, fantasies, dreams, or hallucinations, as well as the emotions associated with these patterns. If such a constantly shifting balance exists between internal and external environmental forces, physiological considerations (e.g., brain function) as well as cultural and experiential factors emerge as major determinants of the content and meaning of hallucinations.
 
The brain is bombarded constantly by sensory impulses, but most of these are excluded from consciousness in a dynamically shifting, selective fashion. The exclusion seems to be accomplished through the exercise of integrative inner mechanisms that focus one’s awareness on selected parts of potential experience. (The sound of a ticking clock, for example, fades in and out of awareness.) Functioning simultaneously, these mechanisms survey information that is stored within the brain, select tiny samples needed to give adaptive significance to the incoming flow of information, and bring forth only a few items for actual recall from the brain’s extensive “memory banks.”
From Encyclopedia Britannica (www.britannica.com)

What Are Visual Hallucinations?

Hallucinations, defined as the perception of an object or event (in any of the 5 senses) in the absence of an external stimulus, are experienced by patients with conditions that span several fields (e.g., psychiatry, neurology, and ophthalmology). When noted by non-psychiatrists, visual hallucinations, one type of sensory misperception, often trigger requests for psychiatric consultation, although visual hallucinations are not pathognomonic of a primary psychiatric illness.
Visual hallucinations have numerous etiologies. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms and offer a differential diagnosis of visual hallucinations, with an emphasis placed on conditions that arise in the context of medical and surgical illness. Treatment typically rests on the underlying etiology, so timely recognition and an understanding of causative mechanisms are crucial.
What Causes Visual Hallucinations?
Numerous hypotheses have been suggested to explain the genesis of visual hallucinations. These have been summarized and categorized: psycho physiologic (i.e., as a disturbance of brain structure), psycho biochemical (as a disturbance of neurotransmitters), and psychodynamic (as an emergence of the unconscious into consciousness). Visual hallucinations can be the result of all 3 processes, given the interplay among disturbances of brain anatomy, brain chemistry, prior experiences, and psychodynamic meaning.
To date, no single neural mechanism has explained all types of visual hallucinations; however, the similarity of visual hallucinations that are associated with seemingly diverse conditions suggests a final common pathway. There are three pathophysiologic mechanisms thought to account for complex visual hallucinations.

The first mechanism involves irritation (e.g., seizure activity) of cortical centers responsible for visual processing. Irritation of the primary visual cortex causes simple elementary visual hallucinations, while irritation of the visual association cortices causes more complex visual hallucinations. These data are supported by both electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and direct stimulation experiments.

Lesions that cause differentiation of the visual system may lead to cortical release phenomenon, including visual hallucinations. Normal inputs are thought to be under the control of inhibitory processes that are effectively removed by differentiation. It has been further suggested that differenced neurons undergo specific biochemical and molecular changes that lead to an overall increase in excitability.

A multitude of lesions can cause this loss of input and inhibit other cognitive functions. Of note, visual hallucinations may be induced by prolonged visual deprivation. One study reported visual hallucinations in 10 of 13 healthy subjects blindfolded for a period of 5 days; this finding lends strong support to the idea that the simple loss of normal visual input is sufficient to cause visual hallucinations.
Finally, due to its role in the maintenance of arousal, the reticular activating system has been implicated in the genesis of visual hallucinations. Lesions of the brainstem have led to visual hallucinations (as in peduncular hallucinosis). Further, visual hallucinations are common in those with certain sleep disorders, and occur more frequently in those who are drowsy. The observation that visual hallucinations occur more frequently in those who are drowsy (even in the absence of frank sleep pathology) suggests that the reticular activating system plays a role in visual hallucinations, although the precise mechanism has not yet been established.
Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity:
 
 
Aliens. Extraterrestrials. Space Men. Whatever you call them, sightings have been around since man first gazed into the skies.
And what follows are 15 signs that just may prove they very well exist.

15. Apollo 11's Sighting Let's start with NASA.
Three Days into the Apollo 11 Mission, the crew reported a strange flying object not far from their location. They assumed it was a piece of the detached SIV-B rocket. That is, until they received word that it was over 6,000 miles away. To this day, the highly-trained crew and team of NASA scientists have no official explanation for what the object could have been. Even famous astronaut Buzz Aldrin confessed to the sighting!


14. Ancient Signs of Modern Technology
These actual Egyptian Hieroglyphics show what appear to be images of a helicopter, submarine, boat, and jet airplane. Many believe this is proof that aliens once visited the ancient Egyptians, arriving in their advanced technology and leaving behind quit an interesting story for our ancestors to tell. But not as interesting as ou next discovery on the list.

13. Napoleon's Micro Chip
Scientist were shocked when they found a small, half-inch long foreign object embedded within the skeletal remains of once French ruler, Napoleon Bonaparte. This seems to go hand-in-hand with Bonaparte's own story of abduction when he disappeared for several days in July 1794, claiming he had been held prisoner against his will by a strange group of men.

12. The Battle of Los Angeles
On February 24, 1942, hundreds of reports flooded a local Los Angeles air base claiming to have spotted a UFO. Worried about another Japanese airstrike after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the sky was quickly filled with searchlights that swiftly found the aircraft. Now here’s where it get’s interesting — Even though the unidentified object was hit multiple times with anti-aircraft fire, it appeared to take no damage and soon disappeared into the night, never to be seen again.

11. The Venus Scorpion
This image, taken from a Soviet probe on Venus is claimed by Russian Scientist Leonid Ksanfomaliti to be a scorpion-like life form living on the surface of the planet. This is the only image sent back to earth to show any anomaly, and the only one found since 1982.

10. The "Wow Signal"
Ohio State University researches picked up a signal coming from nearly 220 million light years away that was so powerful, it was named the "Wow Signal". Scientist are baffled as to how a signal so strong could come from so far away without the use of advanced technology.

9. Near-Collisions
The number of near-collisions involving UFOs and commercial airlines seems only to grow larger with every passing year. There are countless stories, including one by a veteran airline pilot and his first officer flying into Manchester airport who claim to have seen a large "delta-shaped" object heading right for their position. Just as these highly-trained pilots were about to take action to avoid the craft, it disappeared. Many of these encounters are caught on FAA audio tape, and can be heard here:

8. Jupiter's Moon
A 2001 study suggests that Jupiter’s red moon, Europa may very well be made up of frozen red bacteria. Bactria, while small, are a huge sign of the beginning of advanced life forms in space.

7. Alien Fossils
Researchers recently discovered a Martian rock in Antarctica that contained fossilized signs of nano bacteria. If this is the sign they left behind billions of years ago, what might they have evolved into today?

6. Mars Methane
Back in 2004, 3 independent groups all reported massively high amounts of methane within the atmosphere of Mars. That's not very exciting. Until, that is, you realize that nearly all methane on earth is created by living organisms.

5. Alien Ambassador
In September of 2010, The United Nations appointed Malaysian astrophysicist Mazlan Othman to head the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), which deals with all space related activity — including alien visitors.

4. The Mars Microbe
In 2002, Russian scientist discovered a microbe that could withstand an enormous amount of radiation without dying. This is unheard of on earth as this type of adaptation would take billions of years to develop, leading to the theory that this microbe may have originated on mars.

3. Mystery Radio Signals
In 2004, scientist examined a series of radio waves from space only to discover that one signal in particular was getting stronger. This could very well be a sign of alien life attempting to contact us, as radio waves are frequently sent out to space from earth in an attempt to reach life other than our own. Maybe they're finally calling back.

2. The Alien Harvest
After a team of British scientist sent a balloon into the outer reaches the stratosphere, they were baffled when it came back carrying tiny biological organisms. These organisms, which the balloon accidently harvested in space, have the scientist convinced that alien life exists as they believe they can only have originated in space.

1. The Numbers Game
Our galaxy, the Milky Way galaxy, measures up to 120,000 light-years across and contains about 400 billion stars. It’s said that about half of these stars include at least one planet within their orbit. That's a lot of planets, and a good chance for alien life we haven't yet discovered.

15 Facts Supporting Extraterrestrial Life | Humans Are Free
humansarefree.com
 
Monday, 25 February 2013 05:51

How Time Travel Work? part4

We've blown through black holes and wormholes, but there's yet another possible means of time traveling via theoretic cosmic phenomena.
For this scheme, we turn to physicist  J. Richard Gott, who introduced the idea of cosmic string back in 1991. As the name suggests, these are string like objects that some scientists believe were formed in the early universe.
These strings may weave throughout the entire universe, thinner than an atom and under immense pressure. Naturally, this means they'd pack quite a gravitational pull on anything that passes near them, enabling objects attached to a cosmic string to travel at incredible speeds and benefit from time dilation. By pulling two cosmic strings close together or stretching one string close to a black hole, it might be possible to warp space-time enough to create what's called a closed time like curve.

Using the gravity produced by the two cosmic strings (or the string and black hole), a spaceship theoretically could propel itself into the past. To do this, it would loop around the cosmic strings.

Quantum strings are highly speculative, however. Gott himself said that in order to travel back in time even one year, it would take a loop of string that contained half the mass-energy of an entire galaxy. In other words, you'd have to split half the atoms in the galaxy to power your time machine. And, as with any time machine, you couldn't go back farther than the point at which the time machine was created. 
Oh yes, and then there are the time paradoxes. 
 
Time Travel Paradoxes
As we mentioned before, the concept of traveling into the past becomes a bit murky the second causality rears its head. Cause comes before effect, at least in this universe, which manages to muck up even the best-laid time traveling plans.
For starters, if you traveled back in time 200 years, you'd emerge in a time before you were born. Think about that for a second. In the flow of time, the effect (you) would exist before the cause (your birth).

To better understand what we're dealing with here, consider the famous grandfather paradox. You're a time-traveling assassin, and your target just happens to be your own grandfather. So you pop through the nearest wormhole and walk up to a spry 18-year-old version of your father's father. You raise your laser blaster, but just what happens when you pull the trigger?

Think about it. You haven't been born yet. Neither has your father. If you kill your own grandfather in the past, he'll never have a son. That son will never have you, and you'll never happen to take that job as a time-traveling assassin. You wouldn't exist to pull the trigger, thus negating the entire string of events. We call this an inconsistent causal loop.

On the other hand, we have to consider the idea of a consistent causal loop. While equally thought-provoking, this theoretical model of time travel is paradox free. According to physicist Paul Davies, such a loop might play out like this: A math professor travels into the future and steals a groundbreaking math theorem. The professor then gives the theorem to a promising student. Then, that promising student grows up to be the very person from whom the professor stole the theorem to begin with.

Then there's the post-selected model of time travel, which involves distorted probability close to any paradoxical situation What does this mean? Well, put yourself in the shoes of the time-traveling assassin again. This time travel model would make your grandfather virtually death proof. You can pull the trigger, but the laser will malfunction. Perhaps a bird will poop at just the right moment, but some quantum fluctuation will occur to prevent a paradoxical situation from taking place.
But then there's another possibility: The future or past you travel into might just be a parallel universe. Think of it as a separate sandbox: You can build or destroy all the castles you want in it, but it doesn't affect your home sandbox in the slightest. So if the past you travel into exists in a separate timeline, killing your grandfather in cold blood is no big whoop. Of course, this might mean that every time jaunt would land you in a new parallel universe and you might never return to your original sandbox. 

 

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